BIO-497
Senior Honors Thesis I
Prerequisite: senior standing. Permission: department and University Honors program.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Doperalski,A 
 
 
 
CANCELLED
002H
 
03.00
Connaughton,V 
 
 
                                     CANCELLED
 
GOVT-480
Honors Senior Sem Pol Sci I
Prerequisite: GOVT-310. Permission: instructor. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.
CANCELLED
001
 
03.00
Cowell-Meyers,K 
 
 
MTH     12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA     CANCELLED
 
HNRS-097
Honors Research Module
Restriction: AU Honors. Permission: AU Honors program director.
OPEN
002
 
00.00
Mintz,M 
 
 
W       08:20PM 09:35PM  BLIB 306     08/30/17 08/30/17
W 08:20PM 09:35PM BLIB 306 09/27/17 09/27/17
W 08:20PM 09:35PM BLIB 306 10/25/17 10/25/17
W 08:20PM 09:35PM BLIB 306 11/29/17 11/29/17
 
Instructional Method: Hybrid.
(Meets with HNRS 397 002)
CLOSED
003
 
00.00
Mintz,M 
 
 
 
Instructional Method: Online Location: Nairobi, Kenya
OPEN
004
 
00.00
Mintz,M 
 
 
 
Instructional Method: Online Location: Madrid, Spain
HNRS-200
Honors Inquiry I
Restriction: AU Honors program.
CLOSED
001
The Urban Experience 
04.00
Pike,D; Esser,D 
 
 
T       05:30PM 08:00PM  DMTI 121     08/28/17 12/16/17
W 11:20AM 02:10PM KRWN 4 08/28/17 12/16/17
 
The Urban Experience: Between Washington, DC and Kabul, San Pedro Sula, and Ho Chi Minh City (4) Focusing on the urban cultures, local cuisines, and national politics of Afghanistan, Honduras, and Vietnam, this course explores connections as well as tensions between migrant populations residing in the capital of the United States and their homelands. Meets with HNRS-200 002.
OPEN
002
The Urban Experience 
04.00
Esser,D; Pike,D 
 
 
T       05:30PM 08:00PM  DMTI 217     08/28/17 12/16/17
W 11:20AM 02:10PM KRWN 4 08/28/17 12/16/17
 
The Urban Experience: Between Washington, DC and Kabul, San Pedro Sula, and Ho Chi Minh City (4) Focusing on the urban cultures, local cuisines, and national politics of Afghanistan, Honduras, and Vietnam, this course explores connections as well as tensions between migrant populations residing in the capital of the United States and their homelands. Meets with HNRS-200 001.
HNRS-220
Honors Inquiry III
Restriction: AU Honors program.
CLOSED
001
Emotion: Physiology to Ethics 
04.00
Carter,M; Shelford,A; Sha,R 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  HRST 209     08/28/17 12/16/17
W 11:20AM 02:10PM HRST 209 08/28/17 12/16/17
 
Thinking Emotion: From Physiology to Ethics (4) Most people regard their emotions as central to who they are, their self and identity. Yet precisely what is an emotion? Where are emotions?in the mind, body, both? If emotions are conditioned by hunger, fatigue, or surging hormones, how "real" are they? Why do we need to "control" or "express" emotions? Have humans always experienced the same emotions in the same ways? Finally, how do we seek to answer these questions? Drawing on work from philosophy and literature to history and neuroscience, this course investigates not just what people in the western tradition have thought about emotion but how they have thought about it and why. Meets with HNRS-220 002/003.
CLOSED
002
Emotion: Physiology to Ethics 
04.00
Shelford,A; Carter,M; Sha,R 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  HRST 209     08/28/17 12/16/17
W 11:20AM 02:10PM HRST 209 08/28/17 12/16/17
 
Thinking Emotion: From Physiology to Ethics (4) Most people regard their emotions as central to who they are, their self and identity. Yet precisely what is an emotion? Where are emotions?in the mind, body, both? If emotions are conditioned by hunger, fatigue, or surging hormones, how "real" are they? Why do we need to "control" or "express" emotions? Have humans always experienced the same emotions in the same ways? Finally, how do we seek to answer these questions? Drawing on work from philosophy and literature to history and neuroscience, this course investigates not just what people in the western tradition have thought about emotion but how they have thought about it and why. Meets with HNRS-220 001/003.
CLOSED
003
Emotion: Physiology to Ethics 
04.00
Sha,R; Carter,M; Shelford,A 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  HRST 209     08/28/17 12/16/17
W 11:20AM 02:10PM HRST 209 08/28/17 12/16/17
 
Thinking Emotion: From Physiology to Ethics (4) Most people regard their emotions as central to who they are, their self and identity. Yet precisely what is an emotion? Where are emotions-in the mind, body, both? If emotions are conditioned by hunger, fatigue, or surging hormones, how "real" are they? Why do we need to "control" or "express" emotions? Have humans always experienced the same emotions in the same ways? Finally, how do we seek to answer these questions? Drawing on work from philosophy and literature to history and neuroscience, this course investigates not just what people in the western tradition have thought about emotion but how they have thought about it and why. Meets with HNRS-220 001/002.
HNRS-397
Honors Research Module
Restriction: AU Honors. Permission: AU Honors program director.
OPEN
002
 
01.00
Mintz,M 
 
 
W       08:20PM 09:35PM  BLIB 306     08/30/17 08/30/17
W 08:20PM 09:35PM BLIB 306 09/27/17 09/27/17
W 08:20PM 09:35PM BLIB 306 10/25/17 10/25/17
W 08:20PM 09:35PM BLIB 306 11/29/17 11/29/17
 
Instructional Method: Hybrid.
(Meets with HNRS 097 002)
CLOSED
003
 
01.00
Mintz,M 
 
 
 
Instructional Method: Online Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
CLOSED
004
 
01.00
Mintz,M 
 
 
 
Instructional Method: Online Location: Berlin, Germany
CLOSED
005
 
01.00
Mintz,M 
 
 
 
Instructional Method: Online Location: Madrid, Spain
CLOSED
006
 
01.00
Mintz,M 
 
 
 
Instructional Method: Online Location: BU London
CLOSED
007
 
01.00
Mintz,M 
 
 
 
Instructional Method: Online Location: Sydney, Australia
OPEN
008
 
01.00
Mintz,M 
 
 
 
Instructional Method: Online Location: University College London
HNRS-398
Honors Challenge Course
Restriction: AU Honors. Permission: AU Honors program director.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Steele,J 
 
 
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Stogner,M 
 
 
 
CLOSED
003
 
03.00
Leithauser,A; Fedyashin,A 
 
 
 
OPEN
004
 
03.00
Pike,D 
 
 
 
OPEN
005
 
03.00
 
 
 
 
HNRS-498
University Honors Capstone
Restriction: University Honors program. Permission: instructor.
CLOSED
001
Resurrecting Cash Welfare 
01.00-06.00
Hardy,B 
 
 
 
IBUS-300
Fundamentals of Int'l Business
Prerequisite: completion of College Writing Requirement, MKTG-300 or MKTG-250, and junior standing.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Jeong,Y 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  KSB  T61     08/28/17 12/16/17
 
Restriction: Kogod Honors Program.
ITEC-355
Production/Operation Mgmt
Prerequisite: ACCT-241, ECON-200, MATH-211 or MATH-221 (may be taken concurrently), and STAT-204.
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Karaesmen Aydin,I 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  KSB  T61     08/28/17 12/16/17
 
Restriction: Kogod Honors Program.
KSB-096
Selected Topics:Non-Recurring
OPEN
001
Kogod Honors Fieldwork & Devel 
00.00
Rinehart,J 
 
 
W       11:20AM 02:10PM  NSN  OUROS   08/28/17 12/16/17
 
Kogod Honors Program Fieldwork and Development (0) This course fulfills a core element of the Kogod Honors Program, student enrichment and development outside the classroom. Kogod Honors students participate in unique extracurricular and experiential activities and engage in a mentoring program. These opportunities help students sharpen their leadership and networking skills with dynamic and real-world experiences. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Restriction: Kogod Honors Program.
PHIL-398
Honors Project in Philosophy
Permission: department and University Honors director.
OPEN
001
 
03.00-06.00
 
 
 
 
RELG-398
Honors Project in Religion
Permission: department and University Honors director.
OPEN
001
 
03.00-06.00
 
 
 
 
SISU-397
SIS Honors Colloquium
Prerequisite: SISU-206.
OPEN
001
The Responsibility to Protect 
03.00
Quainton,A 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  GRAY 104     08/28/17 12/16/17
 
The Responsibility to Protect (3) The course explores the relatively new international concept of the responsibility to protect. Students examine a series of historical and contemporary examples where the international community failed in this responsibility: the Holocaust, India/Pakistan independence, Rwanda, the Balkans, Syria as well as places where the doctrine has been asserted with mixed results: Kosovo, Libya and Iraq. The course explores the moral, legal and practical issues involved and seeks to challenge students to understand the ambiguities and competing national priorities that make implementation and enforcement possible or likely. Restriction: SIS Honors Program. Meets with SISU-397 101.
(Meets with SISU 397 101)
OPEN
002
Civilizations and World Orders 
03.00
Acharya,A 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  SIS  349     08/28/17 12/16/17
 
Civilizations and World Orders: The Making of Global International Relations (3) The conventional study of international relations relies heavily on concepts and institutions developed in the West. This course offers an alternative perspective by bringing in the contribution of different civilizations, including Near Eastern, GrecoRoman, Indian, Chinese, Islamic, as well as modern Europe, to the making of international relations. It takes a broad sweep of historical developments, such as interactions among classical civilizations leading to the rise of the West, the impact of colonialism and decolonization, the role of postcolonial states in developing global norms and institutions, and the myths and realities behind the notion of a "clash of civilizations." This leads to a new "global" perspective on international relations, or a 'Global IR' that helps students better understand conflict, peace and interdependence in our increasingly complex, multicultural world. Restriction: SIS Honors Program. Meets with SISU-397 102.
(Meets with SISU 397 102)
OPEN
101
The Responsibility to Protect 
03.00
Quainton,A 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  GRAY 104     08/28/17 12/16/17
 
The Responsibility to Protect (3) The course explores the relatively new international concept of the responsibility to protect. Students examine a series of historical and contemporary examples where the international community failed in this responsibility: the Holocaust, India/Pakistan independence, Rwanda, the Balkans, Syria as well as places where the doctrine has been asserted with mixed results: Kosovo, Libya and Iraq. The course explores the moral, legal and practical issues involved and seeks to challenge students to understand the ambiguities and competing national priorities that make implementation and enforcement possible or likely. Permission: SIS Honors Director. Meets with SISU-397 001.
(Meets with SISU 397 001)
OPEN
102
Civilizations and World Orders 
03.00
Acharya,A 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  SIS  349     08/28/17 12/16/17
 
Civilizations and World Orders: The Making of Global International Relations (3) The conventional study of international relations relies heavily on concepts and institutions developed in the West. This course offers an alternative perspective by bringing in the contribution of different civilizations, including Near Eastern, GrecoRoman, Indian, Chinese, Islamic, as well as modern Europe, to the making of international relations. It takes a broad sweep of historical developments, such as interactions among classical civilizations leading to the rise of the West, the impact of colonialism and decolonization, the role of postcolonial states in developing global norms and institutions, and the myths and realities behind the notion of a "clash of civilizations." This leads to a new "global" perspective on international relations, or a 'Global IR' that helps students better understand conflict, peace and interdependence in our increasingly complex, multicultural world. Permission: SIS Honors Director. Meets with SISU-397 002.
(Meets with SISU 397 002)
SISU-440
SIS Honors Project I
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-306.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Knight,S 
 
 
M       11:20AM 02:10PM  MGC  312     08/28/17 12/16/17
 
SPA-396
Selected Topics:Non-Recurring
CANCELLED
004
Law, History, and Justice 
03.00
Klusmeyer,D 
 
 
W       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA     CANCELLED
 
Law, History, and Justice (3) Historical examples, lessons, and precedents are frequently invoked to justify contemporary policy agendas and political views. Controversies over how to interpret constitutional doctrines, principles, and rules always entail fundamental clashes as to how constitutional history should be understood. This course focuses on how judges, legal advocates, and policy-analysts use and abuse history to support their arguments. It focuses on a set of case studies on topics including government corruption, gun rights, presidential power, and racial discrimination. It also explores the politics involved in choosing among different methods of interpretation to advance particular agendas. Restriction: SPA Honors or University Honors Program.