LIT-099
Maintain Matriculation
OPEN
001
 
00.00
 
 
 
 
LIT-107 FA1
Creative Writing Across Genres
WAIT-6
001
 
03.00
Perkins-Valdez,D 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
WAIT-3
002
 
03.00
Voris,L 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
WAIT-4
003
 
03.00
McDonald,H 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-121 FA1
Rethinking Literature
OPEN
001
Desire and Identity 
03.00
Brideoake,F 
 
 
TF      09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Desire and Identity (3) Who, how, and what do we want? How are gender and sexuality distinct and interrelated? How are desires and identities shaped by race, gender, class, embodiment, and nationality? This course considers these questions and more through literary, cultural, and critical texts drawn from the Renaissance to the present day. It serves as an introduction to both literary analysis and the study of gender, sexuality, and queer theory.
OPEN
002
Growing Up 
03.00
Friedman,D 
 
 
MTH     04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Growing Up (3) The Bildungsroman, or novel of development, is the literary genre that addresses questions such as what it means to reach maturity; how do we balance our personal desires with the demands of society; and how do we build a life in a culture that insists we "realize our full potential," yet often seems to prevent us from doing so. In the first half of this course, students read nineteenth-century novels written in response to newly urgent questions about what it meant to be an individual in a recently modernized society. In the second half, the class looks at how contemporary works from queer and postcolonial writers innovate upon traditional narrative forms to tell new kinds of stories about what it means to come of age. Authors discussed include Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Oscar Wilde, Sigmund Freud, James Joyce, Willa Cather, Carson McCullers, Jamaica Kincaid, Alison Bechdel, Abdellah Taïa, and Kazuo Ishiguro.
OPEN
003
Theatre of War 
03.00
Payne,D 
 
 
MTH     12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Theatre of War (3) Winston Churchill coined "theatre of war" at the beginning of World War I, and the phrase has since come to be associated with notions of visuality, spectatorship, and performance as well as martial conflict, death, and loss. Certainly, drama as a literary genre has from its inception intuited that relationship. The oldest script in the Western canon, Aeschylus' The Persians, allowed Athenians to see the aftermath of war from the perspective of the vanquished, an imaginative act of empathy, but the play also justifies brutality as essential to empire-building. Certainly, military leaders have sought to exploit the patriotic potential of performance, flooding arenas to stage naval battles for spectators or clearing fields to perform military maneuvers for onlookers. War as spectacle has acquired especially ominous overtones in our current age of drone warfare, where looking at violence occurs not on a battlefield or even in an arena but in a room secreted away in a secure facility. These are among the themes the class takes up, in addition to thinking about the relationship between theatre and war through these three frames: theatre during wartime; theatre and memory (i.e., the aftermath of war); and theatre as anti-war protest. Readings span the centuries, ranging from Aeschylus to recent works by David Hare and Paula Vogel.
WAIT-2
004
Literary Hauntings 
03.00
Rubenstein,R 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Literary Hauntings (3) Apparitions have long been a staple of fiction, perhaps since early storytellers gathered around the fire to swap spine-tingling tales. What are the sources of readers' perennial attraction to spectral beings, haunted houses, paranormal events, and things that go bump in the night? Students read a diverse selection of short stories and novels by classical and contemporary authors of ghost stories and other literary hauntings, from stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Dickens, W. W. Jacobs, Sheridan LeFanu to Edith Wharton, Margaret Atwood, Steven Mulhauser, Noel Coward's play, Blithe Spirit, and others. Novels include Henry James's The Turn of the Screw, Gaston Leroux's The Phantom of the Opera, Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House, and Susan Hill's The Woman in Black. Students also read historical and scientific approaches to apparitions and supernatural presences.
OPEN
005
Angelheaded Hipsters & Absurd 
03.00
Voris,L 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Angelheaded Hipsters and the Absurd (3) This course surveys the work of the Beats and other experimental writers of the 50s and 60s including Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Diane di Prima, Amiri Baraka and Frank O'Hara, within the postwar context of anti-Communism, consumerism, homophobia, sexism and racism. The course explores uses of the absurd in experimental writing as a response to the absurdity of the suburb, "Leave it to Beaver" norms, the Communist menace and McCarthyism, among other political and cultural trends. The course considers how jazz, drugs, sex and the visionary quest were influences on these literary movements.
LIT-125 FA2
Great Books: Western World
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Brideoake,F 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-146 FA1
Critical Appr to Cinema
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Dussere,E 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
M 08:20PM 10:50PM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
WAIT-1
002
 
03.00
Kakoudaki,D 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
W 05:30PM 08:00PM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
003
 
03.00
Ratekin,T 
 
 
MTH     12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
T 08:20PM 10:50PM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-201 FA1
The Art of Changing Minds
WAIT-6
001
Winning Arguments in Digtl Age 
03.00
Comstock,E 
 
 
MTH     04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Winning Arguments in the Digital Age (3) Donald Trump's election shocked the world, but from a rhetorical perspective, it wasn't so surprising. While Hillary Clinton's ideas and arguments were far more often based in facts and reason, Trump's age-old rhetorical techniques exposed the limits of this strategy in today's political climate. In this course students learn how persuasive rhetoric works--and doesn't work--in the digital age by studying the rhetorical circulation of knowledge, conspiracy theories, forms of denial, urban legends, and fake news. The course explores topics ranging from the 2016 election to climate change denial to #pizzagate. Finally, by studying a range of historical and contemporary works on persuasive rhetoric, as well as recent theories of language and argument, students gain a command of powerful analytical and persuasive strategies.
LIT-211
Survey of American Lit II
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Noble,M 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-215 FA1
Writers in Print/Person
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Dargan,K 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-232 FA1
Shakespeare
WAIT-1
001
Shakespeare's Second Decade 
03.00
Sherman,A 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Shakespeare's Second Decade: Greatest Hits (3) How did Shakespeare become a giant of literature? This course surveys the second half of Shakespeare's career, showing him as a maturing artist weathering political changes and private sorrows, even as he pushes the limits of comedy, masters the art of tragedy, and experiments with romance. Students take a field trip to the Folger Shakespeare Library and attend a live performance.
LIT-235 FA2
African American Lit
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Leonard,K 
 
 
TF      09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-240 FA2
Asian American Literature
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Sha,R 
 
 
MTH     02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-245 FA1
The Experience of Poetry
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Voris,L 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-246 FA1
Cinema & the Twentieth Century
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Middents,J 
 
 
MTH     02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
TH 08:20PM 10:50PM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-250 FA3
Lit, Film & Globalization
WAIT-1
001
 
03.00
Middents,J 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
TH 05:30PM 08:00PM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-267 FA3
Literatures of Global South
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Wong,L 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-281 FA2
Power, Discourse & Pop Culture
WAIT-5
001
 
03.00
Berry,A 
 
 
MTH     04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
WAIT-4
002
 
03.00
Wong,L 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
003
 
03.00
Berry,A 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-315
Topics in American Romanticism
OPEN
001
Sympathy and Human Contact 
03.00
Noble,M 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Sympathy and Human Contact in Romantic American Literature (3) This course analyzes representations of human contact and sympathy in antebellum Romantic American literature. The course considers what human contact meant to authors including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Emily Dickinson, focusing in particular on whether or not they thought it could be experienced with sympathy. Particular attention is paid to the historical and philosophical circumstances giving rise to these two intertwined lines of inquiry.
LIT-334
Topics in Renaissance Lit
OPEN
001
Literatures of Early Empire 
03.00
Sherman,A 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Literatures of Early Empire (3) This course takes a comparative approach to the literature of the early empires, focusing on England, Spain, and Portugal. Students read various genres: picaresque memoirs of ordinary sailors alongside a mythological epic about trade; fiery denunciations of the colonial project alongside pitches for royal funding; a novella about a slave rebellion alongside an Inca history; and more. These accounts of adventure, survival, brutality, greed, courage, commitment and love help capture the revolutionary changes of the early modern world.
LIT-337
Topics in Restoration & 18th C
CANCELLED
001
18th Cent Theatrical Culture 
03.00
Brideoake,F 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
Eighteenth-Century Theatrical Culture (3) The idea of the theatrical celebrity or "star" first originated in the eighteenth century, with performers such as David Garrick and Sarah Siddons lionized in the press and memorialized in figurines, playing cards, and fans. This seminar examines the culture of eighteenth-century stardom, focusing on how eighteenth-century acting styles, dramatic forms, and even theatre architecture transformed the theatre into a site of sociability where audiences could both emulate and worship their most beloved performers. Playwrights include Dryden, Behn, Congreve, Centlivre, Farquhar, Garrick, Foote, and Sheridan.
CANCELLED
002
The 18th Cent Public Sphere 
03.00
Brideoake,F 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
The Eighteenth Century Public Sphere (3) Over the course of the eighteenth century, England witnessed the rise of what J rgen Habermas terms the "bourgeois public sphere," an inclusive, discursive domain in which individuals gathered to discuss social and political issues of mutual interest. This course traces the emergence of this new form of intellectual and sociable community by examining texts by Joseph Addison, Richard Steele, Samuel Richardson, William Hogarth, and others. It also considers the gendered limitations of Habermas's conception of the public sphere by exploring the literary, sociable, and political activities of eighteenth-century authors, scholars, hostesses and celebrities including Elizabeth Montagu, Sarah Scott, the Ladies of Llangollen, and the Duchess of Devonshire
LIT-346
Topics in Film
OPEN
001
Black World Cinema/Resistance 
03.00
Green-Simms,L 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Black World Cinema and Resistance (3) This course focuses on the way that filmmakers from Africa and the African Diaspora engage in various aesthetics of resistance. Topics discussed include colonialism, neocolonialism, slavery and its legacies, racism, queerness, and global black music. Students watch one to two films a week, about half from Africa and the other half from the African Diaspora, in particular the United States, Brazil, and the Caribbean. The various ways that filmmakers influence each other from across the Atlantic is also considered.
LIT-347
Spain/Latin America Lit & Film
OPEN
001
 
03.00
 
 
 
 
LIT-381
Topics in Cultural Studies
OPEN
001
Death, Desire, and Television 
03.00
Berry,A 
 
 
MTH     12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Death, Desire, and Television (3) Since its inception, in broadcasts of atomic bomb tests and the Vietnam War, television associated itself with real and imagined modes of death. The plethora of recent television dramas that take murder as their main subject have revived, replayed, and reinvented this association. This course introduces students to the study of television within the broader discipline of cultural studies by focusing on the television industry and televisual representations of the link between death and desire. The course considers these topics in terms of television history, format, form, and content.
LIT-400
Creative Writing: Fiction
Prerequisite: LIT-107.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Park,P 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-401
Creative Writing: Poetry
Prerequisite: LIT-107.
WAIT-6
001
 
03.00
Keplinger,D 
 
 
TH      05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-403
Creative Writing: Nonfiction
Prerequisite: LIT-107.
WAIT-2
001
 
03.00
 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-440
Adv Std in 19th Century Lit
OPEN
001
Romanticism and Science 
03.00
Sha,R 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Romanticism and Science (3) Writers from Mary Shelley through Goethe and Blake to Keats were steeped in science. Perhaps no other work of literature has done more to shape how we think about science than Frankenstein, and Keats trained to be an apothecary. Students read such works in the context of such scientific developments as the mapping of the brain and nervous systems, the invention of biology as a science, and developments in electromagnetism and energy. Meets with LIT-640 001.
(Meets with LIT 640 001)
LIT-446
Advanced Studies in Film
WAIT-1
001
Frankenstein and Beyond 
03.00
Kakoudaki,D 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
T 08:20PM 10:50PM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Frankenstein and Beyond (3) This course traces the impact of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, beginning from the 1818 novel and exploring its adaptations and variations in theater, film, scientific discourse, and popular culture. Students study classic versions of the Frankenstein story, and examine our fantasies of artificial bodies in gothic and science fiction literature and film, public debates, and new cultural contexts. From the classic 1931 film of Frankenstein, to Metropolis, Blade Runner, Ex Machina, and Westworld, films and TV series that explore the power of monsters, outcasts, robots, cyborgs, and clones in contemporary culture are studied. Meets with LIT-646 001.
(Meets with LIT 646 001)
LIT-467
Adv Std in World Literature
OPEN
001
The Global Novel Now 
03.00
Green-Simms,L 
 
 
W       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
The Global Novel Now (3) This course focuses on contemporary world literature from the global South, by asking what the current cohort of global writers, including Mohsin Hamid, Chimamanda Adichie, Junot Diaz, and Saleem Haddad, have to tell us about the neoliberal now in which we live. Students discuss topics such as race, gender, migration, queerness, and economic development, and examine how the global novel ties into larger and longer discussions about global modernity. Students also engage in independent research. Meets with LIT-667 001.
(Meets with LIT 667 001)
OPEN
002
Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, & Others 
03.00
Rubenstein,R 
 
 
MTH     02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Others (3) This course focuses on a selection of major texts by giants not only of Russian literature but of world literature: Gogol (Dead Souls and stories), Pushkin (Eugene Onegin), Turgenev (Fathers and Children), Dostoevsky (Crime and Punishment), Tolstoy (Anna Karenina), and Chekhov (The Cherry Orchard and stories). Meets with LIT-667 002.
(Meets with LIT 667 002)
LIT-480
Senior Project in Literature
Prerequisite: LIT-479.
WAIT-1
001
 
03.00
Dussere,E 
 
 
MTH     04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Grant,S 
 
 
W       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-490
Ind Study Project in Lit
Permission: instructor and department chair.
CLOSED
001
Archival Research 
01.00-06.00
Payne,D 
 
 
 
LIT-496
Selected Topics:Non-Recurring
WAIT-8
001
Literary Publishing & Editing 
03.00
Young,M 
 
 
M       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Literary Publishing and Editing (3) The first literary magazine, Nouvelles de la Republique des Lettres, was established in 1684. The oldest literary journal in the United States, North American Review, has been published since 1815. Literary journals have endured as they continue to adapt to new technologies; they are often first to discover and publish tomorrow's literary voices. This course explores the many paths of literary editing and publishing with an eye to the past, the changing present, and the future of digital and print mediums. Readings include Washington, D.C. literary journals and anthologies from Gargoyle, Poet Lore, District Lines, District Lit, Barrelhouse, and Potomac River; their editors and publishers are guest speakers. Students also edit an anthology of fiction by D.C. Women Writers, Grace in Darkness, organize the book's launch, and promote the book through local events. Meets with LIT-696 001.
(Meets with LIT 696 001)
LIT-640
Adv Std in 19th Century Lit
OPEN
001
Romanticism and Science 
03.00
Sha,R 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Romanticism and Science (3) Writers from Mary Shelley through Goethe and Blake to Keats were steeped in science. Perhaps no other work of literature has done more to shape how we think about science than Frankenstein, and Keats trained to be an apothecary. Students read such works in the context of such scientific developments as the mapping of the brain and nervous systems, the invention of biology as a science, and developments in electromagnetism and energy. Meets with LIT-440 001.
(Meets with LIT 440 001)
LIT-646
Advanced Studies in Film
CLOSED
001
Frankenstein and Beyond 
03.00
Kakoudaki,D 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
T 08:20PM 10:50PM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Frankenstein and Beyond (3) This course traces the impact of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, beginning from the 1818 novel and exploring its adaptations and variations in theater, film, scientific discourse, and popular culture. Students study classic versions of the Frankenstein story, and examine our fantasies of artificial bodies in gothic and science fiction literature and film, public debates, and new cultural contexts. From the classic 1931 film of Frankenstein, to Metropolis, Blade Runner, Ex Machina, and Westworld, films and TV series that explore the power of monsters, outcasts, robots, cyborgs, and clones in contemporary culture are studied. Meets with LIT-446 001.
(Meets with LIT 446 001)
LIT-650
Theories and Methodologies
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Payne,D 
 
 
TH      05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-653
Readings in Genre: Novel
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Friedman,D 
 
 
M       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-667
Adv Std in World Literature
OPEN
001
The Global Novel Now 
03.00
Green-Simms,L 
 
 
W       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
The Global Novel Now (3) This course focuses on contemporary world literature from the global South, by asking what the current cohort of global writers, including Mohsin Hamid, Chimamanda Adichie, Junot Diaz, and Saleem Haddad, have to tell us about the neoliberal now in which we live. Students discuss topics such as race, gender, migration, queerness, and economic development, and examine how the global novel ties into larger and longer discussions about global modernity. Students also engage in independent research. Meets with LIT-467 001.
(Meets with LIT 467 001)
OPEN
002
Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, & Others 
03.00
Rubenstein,R 
 
 
MTH     02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Others (3) This course focuses on a selection of major texts by giants not only of Russian literature but of world literature: Gogol (Dead Souls and stories), Pushkin (Eugene Onegin), Turgenev (Fathers and Children), Dostoevsky (Crime and Punishment), Tolstoy (Anna Karenina), and Chekhov (The Cherry Orchard and stories). Meets with LIT-467 002.
(Meets with LIT 467 002)
LIT-696
Selected Topics:Non-Recurring
WAIT-1
001
Literary Publishing & Editing 
03.00
Young,M 
 
 
M       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Literary Publishing and Editing (3) The first literary magazine, Nouvelles de la Republique des Lettres, was established in 1684. The oldest literary journal in the United States, North American Review, has been published since 1815. Literary journals have endured as they continue to adapt to new technologies; they are often first to discover and publish tomorrow's literary voices. This course explores the many paths of literary editing and publishing with an eye to the past, the changing present, and the future of digital and print mediums. Readings include Washington, D.C. literary journals and anthologies from Gargoyle, Poet Lore, District Lines, District Lit, Barrelhouse, and Potomac River; their editors and publishers are guest speakers. Students also edit an anthology of fiction by D.C. Women Writers, Grace in Darkness, organize the book's launch, and promote the book through local events. Meets with LIT-496 001.
(Meets with LIT 496 001)
LIT-700
Advanced Fiction Workshop
Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).
WAIT-2
003
 
03.00
Park,P 
 
 
T       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
004
 
03.00
Perkins-Valdez,D 
 
 
TH      05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-701
Advanced Poetry Workshop
Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).
WAIT-2
001
 
03.00
Dargan,K 
 
 
TH      05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-710
The Art of Literary Journalism
Prerequisite: at least 18 credits hours. Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Snyder,R 
 
 
M       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
LIT-731
Teaching of Writing Practicum
Prerequisite: LIT-730.
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Wootton,L 
 
 
 
LIT-733
Special Topics in Literature
OPEN
001
Black Avant-Gardism 
03.00
Leonard,K 
 
 
T       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Black Avant-Gardism (3) Scholar-poet Fred Moten has claimed that "blackness is an avant-garde thing" and that "the avant-garde is a black thing." In this course, Students test the validity of this provocation by examining twentieth-century avant-garde movements from the perspective of sometimes-forgotten African American practitioners and originators. The class considers how the counter-cultural ideals of the avant-garde and the political mandates of African American culture transform each other in the work of these artists. In the process, it is seen just how much blackness as concept, color, and culture has led to powerful and empowering modes of literary innovation; how much avant-garde communities and techniques have revised and renewed blackness and its politics; and just how long the Anglo-American avant-garde has had blackness in its heart.
LIT-793
Directed Research in Lit
Permission: instructor.
CLOSED
001
 
03.00
Dussere,E 
 
 
 
CLOSED
002
 
03.00
Rubenstein,R 
 
 
 
CLOSED
004
 
03.00
Berry,A 
 
 
 
LIT-797
Master's Thesis Seminar
OPEN
001
 
01.00-06.00
Grant,S