SISU-105 FA3
World Politics
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
T 08:10AM 09:25AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
T 08:10AM 09:25AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
003
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
T 08:10AM 09:25AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
004
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
T 08:10AM 09:25AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
005
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
T 08:10AM 09:25AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
006
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
F 08:10AM 09:25AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
007
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
F 08:10AM 09:25AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
008
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
F 08:10AM 09:25AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
009
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
F 08:10AM 09:25AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
010
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
F 08:10AM 09:25AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
011
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
W 08:10AM 09:25AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
012
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
M       11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
W 09:45AM 11:00AM TBA TBA 01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-106
First Year Seminar
Restriction: first-year SIS students.
OPEN
001
Soc Movements/Society in MENA 
03.00
Hardig,C 
 
 
M       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Social Movements and Society in MENA (3) This seminar examines social movements and civil society in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. The Arab Revolts of 2011 brought to the limelight the potential of popular movements rooted in civil society in MENA. In an effort to map this understudied level of MENA politics, this course first introduces students to the history of MENA, foundational scholarly work on non-violent social movements and civil society, basic rules and practices of scholarly research, and proceeds to engage students in a major research project on MENA civil society. Students study several movements for change in the region, including Lebanon (2005), Iran (2009), Tunisia and Egypt (both 2011).
OPEN
002
Water in World Politics 
03.00
Conca,K 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Water in World Politics (3) Water is many things: a basic human need, the lifeblood of critical ecosystems, a source of livelihoods, an unpredictable flow, a powerful destructive force, the chief delivery mechanism for the social and ecological effects of climate change, and a commodity with increasing value in many parts of the world. This seminar examines several of the major water challenges facing the world in the twenty-first century. In doing so, it uses water as a window on several key concepts and processes in world politics, including conflict, cooperation, sovereignty, identity, political economy, justice, borders, and globalization.
OPEN
003
War, Politics & Silver Screen 
03.00
Sajjad,T 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
War, Politics and the Silver Screen (3) From Hollywood thrillers such as Green Zone to Academy Award winners such as The Hurt Locker, the silver screen continues to offer a rich medium for the study of international relations (IR). This seminar uses the medium of films to understand key theoretical issues in IR and examine how contemporary movies reflect our understanding of the nature of the state, the role of U.S. power, transnational challenges such as war, environmental pressures, criminal networks, the behavior of non-state states actors, as well as exploring how they all impact and shape the international system in the twenty-first century.
OPEN
004
Thinking Modern World/Du Bois 
03.00
Bohrt,M 
 
 
M       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Thinking the Modern World with W.E.B. Du Bois (3) W.E.B. Du Bois, a founding figure of the social sciences in the United States, argued that the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line. In this seminar, students explore Du Boisian social thought, how it broke with the academic and popular orthodoxy of its time, and its persistent significance today. Du Bois was a social theorist and researcher for whom processes of racialization and racial domination were central to understanding the modern world. He was also a public intellectual committed to the liberation of oppressed peoples. Engaging with Du Bois's original works and more recent sources, students critically examine the racial dynamics of some of today's most pressing global issues, including inequality, climate change, conflict, and migration, among others.
OPEN
005
Counter Terror Pol & Am Pres 
03.00
Moriarty II,J 
 
 
TH      02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Counter Terrorism Policy and the American Presidency (3) This course examines the evolution of U.S. counter terrorism policy since the end of the Cold War by studying how various American presidents have confronted the challenge of terrorism. As such, it focuses on the similarities and differences that have emerged over the years on how to most effectively counter terrorism. The course carefully examines how international politics interacts with domestic politics to shape, frame, and produce America's counter terrorism policies. The course then shifts to a historical approach to this topic by examining various past presidential administrations. Students explore and debate questions such as what the counter terrorism policy was of each administration; how they decided on this strategy; what factors influenced its creation; how it was implemented; and, of course, whether it was successful. Students develop a comprehensive understanding of what part counter terrorism plays in national security and what the outlook is for countering these threats.
OPEN
006
Woodrow Wilson, Librlsm & Race 
03.00
Adcock,R 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Woodrow Wilson, Liberalism, and Race (3) Alternately celebrated and castigated for pioneering modern American liberalism in foreign and economic policy, Woodrow Wilson's presidency is today a focal point of debate over racism in modern America. This course examines the relation between Wilson's liberalism and his presidential actions in foreign policy, economic policy, and race relations, and whether these actions apply, contradict, or remake the beliefs he brought with him into the White House. As the first and only PhD to become president, Wilson offers a rare opportunity to critically interpret a presidential administration in light of the previous development and articulation of his beliefs across decades of influential scholarship.
OPEN
007
China From the Inside 
03.00
Shapiro,J 
 
 
TH      11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
China From the Inside (3) This course draws on memoirs, documentaries, guest speakers, and student interviews to provide a worm's-eye view of China from 1911 to today. The course provides students with an understanding of the complex challenges of Chinese identity today, as ordinary people try to satisfy their pent-up aspirations and deal with entrenched problems of environmental degradation and political repression.
OPEN
008
Why Do They Love and Hate Us? 
03.00
Shelton-Colby,S 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Why Do They Love and Hate Us? (3) This course examines a number of global issues from a non-Western perspective, including societal values (free speech vs. religious rights, gender equality vs. gender inequality, etc.); environmental degradation; human rights; food security/insecurity; civil liberties vs. internal security; use of force (what concepts of justice govern the use of force and how they vary across cultures); development (is it imperialist of the West to assert that much of the world is not developed?); and human security.
OPEN
009
Environmental Ethics 
03.00
Wapner,P 
 
 
M       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Environmental Ethics (3) This course focuses on how one can live most deeply and responsibly in the face of global environmental dangers, with the aim to understand the meaning of the "good life" at this historical moment of environmental intensification. Students read philosophically oriented and literary texts, and draw on their own experiences of place, memory, writing, and loss to develop ways of knowing and engaging in environmental politics.
OPEN
010
Struggle for Mid East Pol Chng 
03.00
Mokhtari,S 
 
 
TH      11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
The Struggle for Political Change in the Middle East (3) This course focuses on the prospects for political change in the Middle East in light of both the stunning protest movements of 2011 and the considerable obstacles to achieving their aspirations for political change which have emerged since. The course begins with an overview of the various aspects of the initial mobilizations including the primary grievances, the role of youth and women, the role of social media, etc. It then considers the gains, success stories, and ongoing promise of the era of protest and change in the Middle East as well as the many subsequent setbacks and formidable challenges including the turn to violence, the role of foreign powers, Islamist-secular divides, and enduring authoritarian structures. Students consider the unique political context of and differing post-uprising paths taken in Egypt, Tunisia, Bahrain, Libya, Syria, Yemen, and Iran. Throughout the course, they critically examine each county in order to gain better insight into current predicaments and prospects for long-term political change in each case individually and the region as a whole.
OPEN
011
Disasters & Int'l Cooperation 
03.00
Seybert,L 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Disasters and International Cooperation (3) This course examines variously successful international responses to environmental disasters and questions including what impact emergencies such as the Chernobyl nuclear accident and protracted crises like the hole in the ozone layer have on the prospects of international cooperation; who are the main actors seeking to prevent similar problems in the future; and how effective are their strategies. In addition to examining the institutional roots of successful cooperation and the diversity of regional approaches, the class also considers the connections between environmental challenges and questions of economic growth, power, security, international integration, and state sovereignty.
OPEN
012
Globalization 3.0 
03.00
Goodman,L 
 
 
M       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Globalization 3.0 (3) This course considers the three periods of intense globalization which touched the new and the old worlds. Students examine how and why the first two ended badly for Europe, East Asia, and Latin America, and discuss scenarios for the evolution of the current globalization.
OPEN
013
Globalizatn: Winners & Losers 
03.00
Cohn,E 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Globalization: Winners and Losers (3) We live in a globalized world, where goods are produced and then shipped all over the world. Wal-Mart, with its worldwide reach and market power, represents the best and the worst of this global economy. Consumers love its everyday low prices while workers rail against its labor practices and environmentalists fight over whether it is doing enough to reduce its carbon footprint. While Wal-Mart paved the way, Amazon has continued to transform the way consumption, work, community, and the world are thought about. This course examines the global supply chain -- from extraction of natural resources, to manufacturing, distribution, and retail. Students analyze who are the winners and losers in a globalized economy, and think about how business practices, government policies, and consumer demands affect outcomes. Is the only outcome a race to the bottom where workers' rights are sacrificed and developing countries become host to factories that some call sweatshops? Is corporate social responsibility a solution? Is ethical shopping? To make the local-global connection students visit a Wal-Mart store in downtown Washington, D.C. and evaluate its impact on the local community.
OPEN
014
Foreign Policy Simulation 
03.00
Martin,G 
 
 
M       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Foreign Policy Simulation (3) This course gives students the chance to explore how and why American officials make certain foreign policy decisions by examining the process of American foreign policy-making. It also integrates role-playing simulations, which helps students understand the sort of challenges and dilemmas that policy-makers routinely face.
OPEN
015
Iden Pol in Multicultural Soc 
03.00
Heng-Blackburn,P 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Identity Politics in Multiracial Societies: U.S. and Malaysia (3) This course examines the impact of ethnicity, religion, and identity politics on the political, economic, and social development of multicultural societies, with special focus on Malaysia and America. The theoretical inquiry on different and multi-layered "forms of belonging" focuses on structures and agents, institutions, and processes--political, economic, religious, and cultural--that are fundamental to the shaping and re-shaping of identity and culture at the individual, family, communal, national, and global levels. Key determinants of contemporary Malaysian and American identity formation examined include citizenship and nationhood, family and community, ethnicity and race, religion, class, gender, and migration, as well as the impact of the market and mass consumption in a globalizing and interdependent world. Apart from scholarly texts, films/videos, fiction, novels and graphic novels are used to further illuminate the manner in which political, economic, socio-cultural, and religious changes have impacted on the process of identity formation and inter-ethnic cultural construction at the different levels of analysis used in the investigative framework.
OPEN
016
Freedom in Western Democ Thght 
03.00
LeVan,A 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Freedom and Solidarity in Western Democratic Thought (3) Through close readings of Tocqueville and Rousseau, students examine fundamental themes and debates in Western democratic thought such as freedom, inequality, legitimacy, and cultural norms. Students practice civic solidarity through service learning in a low income Washington, DC community, and also utilize ideas from philosophy to analyze how democracies fared during great crises of the last century from World War I through the 2008 economic crash.
SISU-130 FA3
Intercultural Understanding
OPEN
001
 
03.00
 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: Academic Accelerator Program.
OPEN
002
 
03.00
 
 
 
TH      02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: Academic Accelerator Program.
OPEN
003
 
03.00
 
 
 
W       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: Academic Accelerator Program.
OPEN
004
 
03.00
 
 
 
W       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: Academic Accelerator Program.
OPEN
005
 
03.00
 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: International Accelator Program.
OPEN
006
 
03.00
 
 
 
W       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: American Access Program.
SISU-140 FA3
Cross-Cultural Communication
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Groen,G 
 
 
M       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Morosini-Dominick,M 
 
 
M       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
003
 
03.00
Morosini-Dominick,M 
 
 
TH      08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
004
 
03.00
Wigfall-Williams,W 
 
 
TH      02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
005
 
03.00
Kelley,J 
 
 
TH      02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
006
 
03.00
Dibinga,O 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
007
 
03.00
Dibinga,O 
 
 
TH      02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
008
 
03.00
Bates,S 
 
 
TH      11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
010
 
03.00
Moland,N 
 
 
M       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
011
 
03.00
Gargano,T 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
012
 
03.00
Groen,G 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
013
 
03.00
Groen,G 
 
 
TH      11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
014
 
03.00
Wigfall-Williams,W 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
015
 
03.00
Moland,N 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
016
 
03.00
Cromwell,A 
 
 
M       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
018
 
03.00
 
 
 
TH      08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
019
 
03.00
Bates,S 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
020
 
03.00
Cromwell,A 
 
 
TH      08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
022
 
03.00
Taylor,A 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
OPEN
023
 
03.00
Kelley,J 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: SIS majors.
SISU-206
Intro to Int'l Studies Rsrch
Prerequisite: SISU-105. Restriction: International Studies major.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Seybert,L 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Restriction: Global Scholars.
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Moriarty II,J 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
003
 
03.00
King,J 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-210
Peace, Global Sec & Conflt Res
Prerequisite: SISU-105.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Nuamah,K 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Sajjad,T 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
003
 
03.00
Wien,B 
 
 
TF      09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
004
 
03.00
Eralp,D 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
005
 
03.00
Banks,D 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-212 FA3
China, Japan & the U.S.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Heng-Blackburn,P 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-214
Contemporary Latin America
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Giraudy,M 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-215
Contemporary Middle East
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Spath,A 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-216
Contemporary Russia
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Garipov,R 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-220
Int'l Political Economy
Prerequisite: SISU-105.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
003
 
03.00
Tuomi,K 
 
 
MTH     02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-230
Analysis of US Foreign Policy
Prerequisite: SISU-105.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Shelton-Colby,S 
 
 
MTH     12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Ziv,G 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
003
 
03.00
Mislan,D 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
004
 
03.00
Martin,G 
 
 
TF      09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-240
International Development
Prerequisite: SISU-105.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Esser,D 
 
 
TF      08:10AM 09:25AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Freeman,S 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
003
 
03.00
Lambright,G 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
004
 
03.00
Dixon,M 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-250
Env Sustainblty/Global Health
Prerequisite: SISU-105.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Wapner,P 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Wapner,P 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-260
Identity, Race, Gender & Cultr
Prerequisite: SISU-105.
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Persaud,R 
 
 
TF      08:10AM 09:25AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
003
 
03.00
Shinko,R 
 
 
MTH     12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-270
Introduction to Human Rights
Prerequisite: SISU-105.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Mokhtari,S 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Bachman,J 
 
 
TF      09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-280
Comparative/Global Governance
Prerequisite: SISU-105.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
 
 
 
MTH     04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Gutner,T 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-296
Selected Topics:Non-Recurring
OPEN
001
Conquest, Cold War, Globaliztn 
03.00
Fontes,A 
 
 
MTH     04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Conquest, Cold War, Globalization (3) This course explores Latin America with a deep focus on the ties that bind the region to global politics, trade, and conflict. To understand the region's present political, economic, and cultural development and global significance, the course maps the continuums and ruptures between three pivotal epochs: the conquest of the "New World" and the colonial system that developed in its wake; the Cold War and Latin America's place in it; and Latin America in the present age of "hyper-globalization." Because the United States has and continues to exercise particular influence over life in Latin American societies--and vice versa--particular attention is paid to this relationship and its consequences. The course studies local, national, and regional dynamics with an eye for how they connect to transnational processes to answer questions such as how Cold War geopolitics impacted Latin American political conflict; what the War on Drugs looks like in Guatemala; and how U.S. immigration politics affect Mexico's economy, among others.
OPEN
002
Introduction to Antiracism 
03.00
Kendi,I 
 
 
M       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Introduction to Antiracism (3) This course introduces students to the global history and current manifestations of antiracism. Students examine key thinkers, movements, and policies that have sought across time and space to eliminate racial inequities and discrimination. Meets with HIST-296 003.
(Meets with HIST 296 003)
SISU-300
Intro to Int'l Economics
Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Bernhofen,D 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Bernhofen,D 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
004
 
03.00
Silvia,S 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-306
Adv Int'l Studies Research
Prerequisite: SISU-206.
OPEN
001
Olson Scholars Seminar 
03.00
Field,L 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Olson Scholars Seminar (3) Specifically designed for Olson Scholars, in addition to providing each student with support and feedback for an original research project, this course provides an opportunity to reflect critically on theoretical questions about the relationship between social science and ethics. Students are expected to work more and more independently with their mentor, while class time is generally devoted to more theoretical questions. With the help of texts from antiquity through to the present, students discuss questions such as what kinds of things can we have knowledge about, how do we know what we know, what motivates/drives us as researchers and why this matters, what ethical assumptions are contained in our alternative approaches to research, and whether these can be transcended. Consideration of these broad questions helps students think more deeply and critically about their own role as a young researcher on the global stage. Throughout the semester there is also class time set aside for consultations, writing workshops, and student presentations of research.
OPEN
002
Game Theory in Int'l Relations 
03.00
Ohls,D 
 
 
TF      08:10AM 09:25AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Game Theory: Analyzing Choice and Strategy in International Relations (3) This course explores formal models of strategic interaction among actors in international relations--how citizens, politicians, non-governmental organizations, firms, interest groups, international organizations, and states fight for their interests. It uses (mathematical) game theoretic analysis and equilibrium solution concepts to predict how actors behave, and applies these techniques to the study of cooperation in international regimes, counterterrorism, trade relations, compellence and deterrence, and war. Students develop and carry out a research project analyzing strategic interaction on an international topic of their choosing.
OPEN
003
Popular Culture As Data & Site 
03.00
Jackson,P 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Popular Culture as Data and Site: Novels, Films, and TV Shows in International Studies Research (3) If we live our lives not just as servants of our instincts and our interests, but also as deliberative beings striving to make meaningful sense of the world, it stands to reason that our stories and other narrative representations ought to be somehow important to our political and social lives, including our lives as globally-engaged reflective practitioners. This course takes a serious look at the pop-cultural artifacts that make up the broad ecology of our media-saturated lives, and asks what can be learned about international affairs by examining such artifacts. Students examine a variety of ways that the analysis of pop-cultural artifacts can figure into both causal and interpretive explanations of international affairs, and also consider ways of communicating knowledge that fall outside of the traditional research paper. They think about what it means to treat human beings as situated, creative persons engaged in the collective shaping of a world of our making, a world prominently featuring the encounter with difference across boundaries.
OPEN
004
Lang, Symbols, Pract & Ident 
03.00
Boesenecker,A 
 
 
TF      08:10AM 09:25AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Language, Symbols, Practices, and Identities in International Studies Research (3) This course focuses on the theory and application of discourse analysis--the way in which our worlds are constructed and understood through language, symbols, practices, and identities, and the ways in which each of these elements structures politics and societies--in international studies research. After examining the evolution of discourse analysis in the social sciences, students develop a research question, literature review, and research design for their own independent research projects. As students research and refine their individual projects, the class also examines examples of discourse analysis drawn from diverse substantive and geographical areas in international studies research. Students also receive training in NVivo qualitative analysis software and are required to use this software as part of their final research project. Each student produces a full independent, scholarly research project, including an original research paper and a presentation, that should serve as the basis for future research, conference presentations, and even potential publication.
OPEN
005
Lang, Symbols, Pract & Ident 
03.00
Boesenecker,A 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Language, Symbols, Practices, and Identities in International Studies Research (3) This course focuses on the theory and application of discourse analysis--the way in which our worlds are constructed and understood through language, symbols, practices, and identities, and the ways in which each of these elements structures politics and societies--in international studies research. After examining the evolution of discourse analysis in the social sciences, students develop a research question, literature review, and research design for their own independent research projects. As students research and refine their individual projects, the class also examines examples of discourse analysis drawn from diverse substantive and geographical areas in international studies research. Students also receive training in NVivo qualitative analysis software and are required to use this software as part of their final research project. Each student produces a full independent, scholarly research project, including an original research paper and a presentation, that should serve as the basis for future research, conference presentations, and even potential publication.
OPEN
006
Large Sample Data Analysis 
03.00
King,J 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Large Sample Data Analysis (3) This applied research course focuses on the Large N quantitative analysis approach, specifically, developing statistical models to explain and predict real world socio-political phenomena. Students acquire skills needed to solve common analytical quests and questions, including the acquisition, management, manipulation, estimation and interpretation of findings from large sample data, using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Students also learn common techniques for displaying and communicating findings for professional and lay audiences, culminating in the development of an original research project. The course requires the use of SPSS (a statistical software program), although no particular expertise with math, statistical theory, or statistical software is required.
CANCELLED
007
Res Meth in Viol/Insec Spaces 
03.00
Fontes,A 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
Research Methodologies in Violent and Insecure Spaces (3) Whether in the midst of war or extreme peacetime violence, deep insecurity transforms how individuals, communities, and entire societies function. Understanding and analyzing the causes and consequences of life lived under such conditions can be extremely difficult. For researchers, conducting on-the-ground fieldwork in such spaces presents a unique set of conundrums. Everyday chaos and insecurity restrict researcher access and undermine official data. The inherent instability of truth increases exponentially, and the power of fearful rumors and suspicion to corrode trust with gatekeepers, informants and even friends is a constant threat. Drawing from scholarly, journalistic, and literary sources, this course explores the processes, dynamics, and consequences of life lived in the shadow of extreme violence. Students study and analyze research and writing methods researchers and writers have used in efforts to capture and portray the processes and dynamics that give rise to violent conditions and how people survive day to day in the shadow of severe insecurity.
OPEN
008
Bottom-Up Politics Models/Meth 
03.00
Zhang,Y 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Bottom-Up Politics: Models and Methods (3) Great powers, durable institutions, and consequential social changes often emerge out of local events, small ideas, and interpersonal interactions. This course examines bottom-up processes and micro-foundations of macro politics by covering theoretical models including rational choice theory, microsociology, social network analysis, organizational decision making, and social movement theories. It also discusses how to apply these bottom-up models to national and international politics, broadly defined. In addition, the course equips students with corresponding research methods and project management skills.
OPEN
009
Qualitative Analysis 
03.00
Hardig,C 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Qualitative Analysis (3) This course guides students in the application of a broad range of qualitative research methodologies and methods. Specifically, this course emphasizes three significant styles of research in the social sciences: neopositivist small-n comparative case study; interpretive ethnography; and post-structural discourse analysis. Throughout the semester students are led through the research process to the completion of an independent original research project. There is special emphasis on the fields of international relations and comparative politics.
OPEN
010
Jay Z & Historical Biography 
03.00
Dibinga,O 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Jay Z and The Practice of Historical Biography (3) This course looks at biography as a form of historical writing, using Jay Z as a point of departure. The course examines how biography shapes our historical understanding as well as the people and institutions of the past. Questions explored include how does biography reveal the historical circumstances of the subject's life to give readers a broader understanding of the historical context of that life and the era in which the subject lived; how effectively can contemporary readers explore the past through the prism of one person's life; and what we seek to learn about a person in a biography, and why. Students produce an independent paper on an individual of their own choosing who is significant to the field of international studies research.
OPEN
011
Ethnography/DC Diaspora Popul 
03.00
Metelits,C 
 
 
TF      08:10AM 09:25AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Ethnography and Washington, DC Diaspora Populations (3) This course introduces the use of ethnographic research methods to study questions of international relations related to diaspora populations including why and when members of diaspora populations send money "home," do diaspora populations contribute to conflict or peace in their home countries, how are nationalisms changed through the experience of living in the United States, and how inter-generational relations within diaspora populations affect reverse brain drain. Ethnography requires the researcher to understand cultural phenomena from the point of view of the subjects of the study by observing and participating in naturally occurring settings. Students select a research question related to a Washington, DC diaspora population, and then become participant-observers among that population to gather ethnographic data. The class discusses negotiating access, taking ethnographic field notes, ethical issues, data analysis, and write up. Students learn NVivo qualitative data analysis software. The final product is a substantial original research paper.
OPEN
012
Qual Meth for Resrch the City 
03.00
Collins,E 
 
 
MTH     08:10AM 09:25AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Qualitative Methods for Researching the City (3) This course introduces qualitative methods of urban research. Students study the social, political, cultural, and built urban environment using ethnographic, historical, and spatial methods of analysis. The course places particular emphasis on the relationship between theory, methods, and empirics in research design and implementation.
OPEN
013
Climate Policy Analysis 
03.00
Grober-Morrow,D 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Climate Policy Analysis (3) This course introduces students to the use of Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) to analyze climate policies. IAMs integrate models of the physical environment with socio-economic models to study the effects of climate change and climate policies. These models are implemented in various kinds of computer software, ranging from complex spreadsheets to sophisticated standalone programs. Students learn to set up these computer-based models to evaluate particular policies and to critically interpret the quantitative data that the models produce. Students complete and present an independent scholarly research project, which should serve as the basis for future research, conference presentations, or publication.
OPEN
015
Field Research Methods 
03.00
Auerbach,A 
 
 
TF      09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Field Research Methods (3) This course prepares students for independent field research. Students acquire methodological skills and data collection strategies that have broad application to both academic research and international program evaluation. The course covers a range of field methods, including ethnography, archival research, interviews, focus groups, surveys, and field experiments, as well as the theoretical, logistical, and ethical aspects of field research design.
OPEN
016
Mod World Order in Hist Contxt 
03.00
Morosini-Dominick,M 
 
 
MTH     12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Modern World Order in Historical Context (3) Global in scope and comparative in its research approach, this course provides students with the opportunity to use qualitative research methods in the social sciences, such as historiography, ethnography, case studies, counterfactuals, discourse analysis, and archival research. The course further acquaints students with the nature of political science as an intellectual enterprise that is soundly grounded in a broader historical context.
OPEN
018
Big Data Analytics/Text Mining 
03.00
Cogburn,D 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Big Data Analytics and Text Mining (3) This course helps students understand the opportunities and challenges of big data analytics in international affairs research by introducing the tools and techniques used to analyze large-scale unstructured textual data. Text mining techniques are applicable for a wide range of social science research topics, such as identifying core themes in State Department speeches; analyzing sentiment in Twitter feeds; detecting emerging areas of concern in an email archive; and highlighting similarities and differences in national reports on international treaty commitments. The course includes some theoretical background, but focuses on learning the tools and techniques to find the proverbial needle in the international affairs big data haystack. Students develop an original text mining project and produce an original research paper.
OPEN
019
Hist Research in Int'l Studies 
03.00
Adcock,R 
 
 
TF      09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Historical Research in International Studies (3) This course introduces modes of historical research in international studies that emphasize the use of primary sources. There are multiple such modes, from the longstanding traditions of diplomatic history and historical case studies, to contemporary research agendas in international history and history of international thought. Students are introduced to opportunities, challenges, and choices involved in accessing and interpreting a variety of primary sources, from sources available online, to those available at the library, to archival materials. The course highlights methodological pluralism in the way primary sources are used, examining examples of historical research employing both interpretive and neo-positivist methodologies. As students learn about the varieties of primary sources, of traditions and agendas in historical research, and of methodologies, they develop, situate in the literature, and undertake a methodologically self-reflective research project of their own. Students produced an independent piece of historical research that could be a basis for future research, conference presentations, and even potential publication.
OPEN
020
Field Rsrch Mthd in Int'l St 
03.00
Lambright,G 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Field Research Methods in International Studies (3) This course introduces students to field research methods commonly used in research on economic and political development. The course explores a wide range of field research methods employed by development studies scholars, including ethnography, participant observation, focus groups, interviews, and surveys and uses these methods to examine important research questions related to the meanings and impacts of development in domestic and international contexts. Students are able to draw on the wide range of possible subject populations in the Washington, DC metro area, including local residents, U.S. government employees, think tank researchers, NGO staff, and journalists, in conducting their research.
OPEN
021
Sociocultural Field Research 
03.00
Venturelli,S 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/17/18 01/17/18
W 02:30PM 05:20PM TBA TBA 01/31/18 01/31/18
W 02:30PM 05:20PM TBA TBA 02/14/18 02/14/18
W 02:30PM 05:20PM TBA TBA 02/28/18 02/28/18
W 02:30PM 05:20PM TBA TBA 03/07/18 03/07/18
W 02:30PM 05:20PM TBA TBA 03/21/18 03/21/18
W 02:30PM 05:20PM TBA TBA 04/04/18 04/04/18
W 02:30PM 05:20PM TBA TBA 04/18/18 04/18/18
 
Instructional Method: Hybrid. Sociocultural Field Research on Deeper Drivers of International Crises (3) International crises and conflicts that persist in varied sociocultural and geographic environments often seem resistant to peacebuilding and stabilization initiatives. They also present a significant challenge to conventional theories. This course provides students with the framework and methods to investigate twenty-first century conflicts and crises in the field, and to identify and analyze the underlying complex drivers of instability. Drawing from lessons of wars and instability over the past decade in regions around the world, the course focuses on a set of complex sociocultural factors and their dynamic interactions that are critical to understanding the deeper motivations, interest and intent of key conflict players. Using field-simulation workshops, secondary and primary source analysis, and guided independent research projects, students develop some core field investigation skills relevant both to international crisis research and to the design of more effective international policy.
OPEN
022
The Case Study Approach 
03.00
 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
The Case Study Approach (3) At its core, the case study approach compares things in order to identify the causes of key phenomena. This simple goal underlies the use of case studies both in scholarship and in the world of practitioners, where conclusions drawn from case studies are referred to as "lessons learned" or "best practices," and generalize about the best way that these can best be achieved under the heading of "knowledge management." This course familiarizes students both with a range of different strategies for using case studies within a primarily positivist and qualitative framework, and with techniques for designing good knowledge management strategies to bring the use of case studies into the workplace. The course concludes in a substantial original research paper and presentation, building on students' previous work.
OPEN
024
Researching Islam 
03.00
Ahmed,A 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Researching Islam: Research Methodology in a Time of Globalized Terror (3) After the events on 9/11 and the beginning of the global war on terror, the need to understand the Muslim world became more urgent than ever. Many questions emerged among the academic community, including what the Islamic standpoint is on violence and its justification; what Islamic traditions are most promising for support of peacemaking; what are the most important issues and forces behind contemporary Islamic activism; and how Muslims are engaging with the globalized world. Many understood, especially academics and policymakers, the need to understand Muslim societies beyond the caricatures and superficial level too often employed in the media. While the understanding of Muslim societies is needed, it is first necessary to understand how to conduct in-depth research in the field among these societies to be able to answer more substantive research questions. In this course students examine Muslim culture and customs and the best approaches towards fieldwork methodology among Muslim societies, looking at interview methods, use of surveys, and discourse analysis. Students study the methods of conducting ethnography in Muslim communities, the various challenges of doing so and how to interpret the findings, and use these skills to develop and conduct a research project of their own.
OPEN
026
Case Study Methods 
03.00
Mislan,D 
 
 
MTH     08:10AM 09:25AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Case Study Methods (3) This course surveys the various techniques associated with small-n neo-positivist research in international studies. These include process tracing, congruence methods, elite interviewing, historiography, and more. Ultimately, students are trained to design and execute case study research. Thus, the course is practice-based, with fewer lectures and more guided activities. Students complete their own original case study research on a topic of their choosing.
OPEN
027
Field Res Uncrtnty/Pol of Fear 
03.00
Fontes,A 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Field Research, Uncertainty, and the Politics of Fear (3) One of the distinguishing features of modern human existence is a deep and abiding sense of uncertainty. "Living precariously" has become a byword for everyday life around the globe. Meanwhile, on a global level, the politics of fear have gained renewed traction as societies around the world struggle with the consequences of socio-economic globalization, social and political conflict, and climate change. The problem of uncertainty and the politics of fear also pose unique conundrums for social science research, including how to distinguish between truth and fiction when prejudice, fear, or outright violence distort efforts to explain certain social phenomena; and how to use rumors, sensationalist reporting, and deeply biased information to understand social relationships and processes of power. This course engages a variety of interpretivist research and writing methods--including ethnography, participant observation, life histories, and discourse analysis, among others--to guide students through the problems and possibilities of conducting research in and on spaces, communities, and discourses of fear and uncertainty. Students complete an independent research project on a topic of their choosing, including an original research paper and presentation, to serve as the basis for future research, conference presentations, and even potential publication.
SISU-310
Topics Peace/Glb Sec/Con Res
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-210.
OPEN
001
Pol of Conf/Conf Res in Africa 
03.00
Metelits,C 
 
 
TF      09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
The Politics of Conflict and Conflict Resolution in Africa (3) This course focuses on the politics of recent and on-going large-scale political violence (i.e., lethal contention among social groups and political factions, governmental repression, insurgencies, etc.) in the African context. The course provides students with analytical frameworks for thinking about these different actors and dimensions of conflict, and trains students to formulate and present their own analyses of conflicts.
OPEN
002
Gender and Peace Building 
03.00
Wien,B 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Gender and Peace Building (3) Female power is rising worldwide, at a time when sexual violence is also increasing. Gender is also being redefined, and women's roles in peacemaking, peace-building, and peacekeeping are growing. Research shows females have been challenging unjust authority, brokering peace agreements, negotiating ceasefires, and advancing human rights at enormous personal risks, although their contributions are rarely featured in textbooks or official records. This course explores cutting-edge issues of gender and peace from multiple angles and perspectives. Students engage in active-learning and diverse teaching styles.
OPEN
003
Comp Authorit: Inst & Pract 
03.00
Spath,A 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Comparative Authoritarianism: Institutions and Practices (3) This course begins with two fundamental questions about authoritarian governance: how authoritarian regimes differ from democracies, and how they differ from each other. The course explores comparative frameworks that differentiate among the diverse forms of dictatorship and focuses on specific cases to examine the dual dilemmas of dictatorship. How can authoritarian governments mobilize necessary political support while simultaneously restricting political freedoms, and how can authoritarian governments encourage economic development and investment without political institutions that inhibit exploitation by government officials? Students gain a nuanced understanding of non-democratic political systems and are able to identify characteristics of autocratic governance, the many ways authoritarian power is exercised by governments, and the unique challenges they face.
OPEN
004
Negotiation & Conflict Resol 
03.00
Wanis-St. John,A 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (3) Negotiation is a powerful force if conducted with tactics, strategy, and knowledge of its dynamics. The choice to negotiate fills the conceptual space between coercion and submission. It's what do we do when we can't simply get our way in international affairs. We can threaten, but pure coercion often generates a backlash. We can also yield, but that might diminish credibility and invite predatory behavior. In this seminar students learn how real international negotiations unfold, why they succeed and fail. The course combines theory and history and offers students opportunities to practice and refine their own skills.
SISU-318
Topics Global Sec/Foreign Pol
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-210 or SISU-230.
OPEN
001
Causes of War 
03.00
Jensen,B 
 
 
T       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Causes of War (3) Through this course students become familiar with some of the major theoretical issues in the study of global security as well as key actors and institutions. In addition to addressing central issues such as war and conflict, weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, the course helps students apply theories and existing bodies of knowledge to better understand contemporary and emerging global security issues.
OPEN
004
How Small Wars End 
03.00
Belding,W 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
How Small Wars End (3) This course examines two of the most vexing problems of insurgencies: why asymmetric conflicts pitting weaker non-state actors against stronger established nations typically last so long, and often result in tenuous, short-lived peace. The median duration of insurgencies since 1945 is 8.5 years, and barely half end with a resolution that endures for more than a decade. Students in this course gain an understanding of the forces that determine how small wars end and what can be done to create a stable and sustainable post-conflict environment.
SISU-319
Arab-Israeli Relations
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-210.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Atzili,B 
 
 
TF      09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-320
Topics in Global Economy
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-220. May be taken A-F only.
OPEN
001
International Economic Policy 
03.00
Poole,J 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
International Economic Policy (3) The United States is an increasingly globalized economy, integrated with other countries through international trade in goods and services, through direct foreign investment, and through labor migration. This course discusses the implications of globalization for the United States and the world economy, touching on topics that surface in the news daily, such as the impact of globalization on income, poverty, inequality, the environment, child labor, and conflict. Other topics include the impact of offshoring on blue-collar and white-collar jobs and multinational corporate social responsibility. Finally, the course addresses the role of international labor migration on both the source and destination countries and the potential for brain drain and brain gain.
SISU-324
Topics in Pol Econ of Latin Am
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-220.
OPEN
001
Pol Economy of Latin America 
03.00
Taylor,M 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Political Economy of Latin America (3) Over the past century, Latin America has been a fertile testing ground for a variety of economic and political theories of development. Economic experiments have ranged from liberalism through socialism, passing through various forms of state-led capitalism along the way. Political experimentation has included everything from populist authoritarianism to military rule, and from hybrid democracies to vibrant multiparty presidential democracies. The remarkable variation in these forms of economic and political organization has been matched by the breadth of actors and ideologies present in the fabric of Latin American states. Drawing on the rich toolbox of comparative political science, this course examines how political and economic organization influence each other, the foundations of the ideas and beliefs that underpin political and economic institutions, and the evolution of Latin American states and economies since World War II.
SISU-330
Topics in Natl Sec/Foreign Pol
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-230.
OPEN
001
Israel's National Security 
03.00
Arbell,D 
 
 
W       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Israel's National Security: Challenges and Strategies (3) Israel's national security is based on the interdependence between defense, political, and economic factors, with the military, intelligence, and diplomacy playing a critical role in safeguarding it. As the world witnesses a realignment of the great powers and the Middle East is dramatically changing, Israel faces great challenges and Israel's national security will depend on its ability to adapt to the new realities. This course reviews the history and evolution of Israeli national security, examines principles and roles of institutions in war and peace, analyzes challenges facing Israel including the rise of radical Islam, the growth of cyber warfare, and higher sophistication of terrorist organizations, and how it deals with them.
OPEN
002
Negotiating Global Challenges 
03.00
Ziv,G 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Negotiating Global Challenges (3) The twenty-first century presents daunting challenges to U.S. foreign, policy. Instability looms large and it is clear that the future U.S. role as a global leader is anything but assured. This course addresses the critical questions of how the United States has confronted serious policy challenges in the past and what U.S. policymakers need to do in the coming years to preserve American power, further U.S. interests, and enhance global stability. Students draft policy memos, conduct debates, and partake in simulations focused on the issues of paramount concern to U.S. foreign policy makers.
OPEN
003
Domestic Sources of USFP 
03.00
Murray,S 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Domestic Sources of United States Foreign Policy (3) This course focuses on the societal forces of United States foreign policy including the media, interest groups, and public opinion. The course considers the extent to which leaders can shape public opinion and the extent to which their actions are constrained by domestic politics.
OPEN
004
Diplomatic Practice 
03.00
Quainton,A 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Diplomatic Practice (3) This seminar studies diplomacy in theory, history, and practice, as a political process and as an instrument of foreign policy. It covers diplomats' relations with their own governments as well as the countries in which they serve; how they use information on the politics, economics, and society of their host nation; the origin and costs of mistakes; and the future of diplomacy in an era of globalization and instant communication. It seeks to illustrate approaches to diplomacy through historical examples and contemporary case studies, linking diplomatic practice to current events.
OPEN
005
Comparative Foreign Policy 
03.00
Mislan,D 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Comparative Foreign Policy (3) This course studies foreign governments and their foreign policy behavior. By looking at domestic politics as the driver of a state's foreign policy, this field provides an alternative to traditional international relations (IR) theory. This course introduces students to the field's core concepts and surveys the foreign policies of great and mid-level powers. Students complete their own research projects on a country of their choosing.
OPEN
007
Intelligence & Nat'l Security 
03.00
Rovner,J 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Intelligence and National Security (3) The United States invests a great deal of money and manpower on intelligence, but not everyone is satisfied with the return on investment. In response to alleged intelligence failures before and after 9/11, Congress ordered a sweeping reorganization of the intelligence community, culminating in the most substantial changes since World War II. Meanwhile, scholars went back to basic questions, including the relationship between intelligence and national security; how does intelligence influence foreign policy and strategic decisions; why does it succeed or fail; and is it possible to conduct secret intelligence in a way that is consistent with the values of government transparency, public accountability, and individual freedom. This seminar provides an overview of the theory and practice of U.S. intelligence. It details the sources and methods used by collectors, the nature of intelligence analysis, and the relationship between intelligence agencies and policymakers. It also contains a short history of the U.S. intelligence community and evaluates the ongoing efforts to reform it. Finally, it discusses the uneasy role of secret intelligence in a modern democracy.
OPEN
008
Cyber Sec/Conflt in Int'l Rel 
03.00
Novotny,E 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Cyber Security and Conflict in International Relations (3) This course introduces students to the history, issues, policies, and future of cyber security as it relates to international conflict and relations among nations. The course covers developments in cyberspace as they relate to espionage, terrorism, cyber warfare, and cyber crime. Students also obtain an understanding of cyberspace law and governance and an introduction to the technical aspects of cyber security, including issues of privacy, surveillance, and social media.
SISU-334
USFP toward Latin America
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-230.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Cohn,E 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-340
Topics in Global Inequalty/Dev
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-240.
OPEN
001
The Politics of Foreign Aid 
03.00
van Bastelaer,T 
 
 
TH      05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
The Politics of Foreign Aid (3) This seminar offers a broad survey of the international politics of foreign aid. Specifically, the use of official development assistance as a foreign policy tool, as well as the wide variety of international actors involved in the allocation of foreign aid is examined. The course seeks to understand the motivations behind the giving of aid as well as the impact of foreign aid in recipient countries. Several themes in the political economy of development are addressed including economic growth, governance, democracy promotion, human rights, and complex emergencies. Students learn about the benefits and harms associated with foreign aid from a variety of perspectives.
OPEN
003
Urbanization in Africa 
03.00
 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Urbanization in Africa (3) This course explores the critical issues related to urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa, one of the world's most rapidly urbanizing regions. The course explores a range of issues related to governance, service delivery, infrastructure, and transportation across a diverse set of cases, ranging from small and medium sized African towns to examples of African megacities, such as Kinshasa, Lagos, and Nairobi. The course critically examines the factors that contribute to urban inequalities and the strategies undertaken to improve living conditions of African urban residents.
OPEN
004
Religion, Security & Devel 
03.00
Esser,D 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Religion, Security and Development (3) This course examines complex causal relationships between religious practices and institutions, freedom from bodily harm, and human development across its economic, ecological, social and political dimensions. It covers different traditions of Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Buddhism and Agnosticism; explores different forms of violence at the scales of households, communities, sub-national regions, countries, and world regions; and integrates qualitative and basic quantitative methods of inquiry. Assigned readings comprise monographs and excerpts from textbooks as well as book chapters and scholarly articles. In addition to developing substantive knowledge about the religion-security-development nexus, students should expect the course to help them train their analytical and writing skills.
SISU-349
Topics Glb Ineq,Dev,Env,Hlth
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-240 or SISU-250.
OPEN
002
Politics of Population 
03.00
Robinson,R 
 
 
TF      09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Politics of Population (3) This course introduces students to population studies, which includes the analysis of population structures and dynamics overall, as well as the specific study of fertility, mortality, and migration. In particular, the class reflects on how these areas have been politicized by various actors at different points in time around the world. Research on the relationship between population growth and the environment, the impact of age structure on security and conflict, the influence of family planning programs on fertility, the effect of aging on the economy, and a variety of issues related to international migration are explored. Meets with SOCY-396 003.
(Meets with SOCY 396 003)
SISU-350
Topics in Env Sustain/Glb Hlth
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-250.
OPEN
001
Int'l Food & Agricultural Pol 
03.00
Graddy-Lovelace,T 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
International Food and Agricultural Politics (3) This course analyzes key international food and agricultural policies by contextualizing them, with the guiding intention to provide a forum wherein students learn from and contribute to the work underway in cultivating more socially just and ecologically sustainable agri-food systems, in the United States and abroad. The course begins with historical and geographical contexts, such as colonialism to slavery, of agriculture and agricultural policy in the Americas. The class then studies policies and political theories related to the pressing issues at stake in agriculture, be they ecological (soil and biodiversity erosion, water pollution and carbon emissions) or socio-economic (hunger, labor, health, agrarian livelihood). Finally, the course ends by engaging proposed resolutions to these issues from reforms to revolutions to regenerations. By employing a post-colonial perspective, the course provides in-depth context on dominant, oversimplified policy tropes such as climate-smart agriculture, farm subsidies, and feeding the world. Key questions examined include what constitutes sustainable agriculture or agroecology; what constitutes community food security, food justice, and food sovereignty; how these lofty goals are contested and negotiated through political debate and whether they can be facilitated through policy. As a part of this course, students will engage with a nonprofit agency or school in the D.C. area to apply their course knowledge to this course.
SISU-352
Environmental Politics of Asia
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-250.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Shapiro,J 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-358
Global Health
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-250, or STAT-202 and PUBH-340.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Carruth,L 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Carruth,L 
 
 
TF      04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-360
Topics in Iden/Race/Gend/Cultr
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-260.
OPEN
001
Race/Ethnicity Across Americas 
03.00
Bohrt,M 
 
 
MTH     12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Race and Ethnicity across the Americas (3) This course is an introduction to the politics of race and ethnicity across the Americas in comparative and historical perspective. The course is about how racial thought differently took hold across the region, how race and ethnicity came to differentially structure access to rights, resources, and recognition in various sociohistorical contexts, and how ethnic and racial movements have contested exclusion nationally and internationally. The course encourages students to think critically and historically about the politics and workings of race and ethnicity across and beyond the Americas.
SISU-370
Topics Just/Ethics/Human Rgts
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-270
OPEN
001
Free Speech: Right or Crime 
03.00
Benesch,S 
 
 
W       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Free Speech: Inalienable Right or Crime (3) The right of freedom of expression is being put to vigorous use around the world, in the best and worst ways, especially online. In China, netizens meet on a bootleg version of Twitter and on web forums, racing government censors who delete their posts. In France, cartoonists and others were massacred in January 2015 for the content of their magazine. On YouTube, female students' daily movements were tracked online by their classmates, along with scenarios for raping them. ISIS proudly posts videos of beheadings. In Russia, extremist bloggers call for another Holocaust. In Kenya, hate speech was broadcast via SMS blasts, leading to mass killings, but at the same time, Kenyans used SMS and the web to report and contain violence. This interdisciplinary course examines how speech contributes to democracy, as well as to hatred and atrocities. The course studies international law and policy related to freedom of expression, with special reference to digital communications, together with cases including the ones mentioned above and the knotty questions they pose, such as how to let free speech flourish while inhibiting hate, terrorism, and genocide.
OPEN
003
Just/Eth/Human Rgts Hispaniola 
03.00
Wigfall-Williams,W 
 
 
MTH     11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Justice, Ethics, and Human Rights in Hispaniola (3) This course begins with a focus on the long-standing contentious relationship between the Dominican Republic (DR) and Haiti. Although the two nations share the island of Hispaniola, the relationship between them has neither been neighborly nor cooperative. The Dominican government passed legislation in 2013 mandating that Dominicans of Haitian descent who do not have official citizenship documents and were born after 1929 be stripped of their citizenship and deported to Haiti immediately. This legislation has an impact on the stability of both nations. Students examine the history of the Dominican Republic and its struggles with defining its national identity, identify the myriad strategies employed to whiten the nation, and develop recommendations to mitigate the serious threat to nearly 300,000 Haitian migrants and Dominicans of Haitian descent residing in the DR. The course examines how the stark differences in human rights protections for Dominicans of Haitian descent residing in the Dominican Republic not only violates their human rights, but denies them legal recourse.
OPEN
004
Perspectives on Ethics & Power 
03.00
Field,L 
 
 
TF      09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Perspectives on Ethics and Power (3) Every day, everywhere, people form judgments about actions: the actions of ourselves and others, and of corporations, governments, and international organizations. While we care passionately about the questions was that just; was it fair; was it necessary?, our answers are often inconclusive. In this course students learn to think critically and systematically about ethics. The field of ethics is interested in the norms that govern collective life, and in the question of what human beings owe to one another. Serious ethical judgment, however, involves more than mere appeal to convention, authority, or opinion; instead, it requires articulation of coherent perspectives on right action, careful consideration of alternative views, and critical reflection on the limits of human judgment. A variety of established theories of ethics such as Realism, Utilitarianism, Deontology, Virtue Ethics, and Postmodern Ethics are studied and students work to put them in conversation with each other through the use of case studies. A persistent underlying question is whether it is possible, and important, to define a universal ethics, or whether morality can and should only be shaped and defined locally.
OPEN
005
After War: Rebuilding States 
03.00
Sajjad,T 
 
 
MTH     09:45AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
After War: Rebuilding Shattered States (3) What happens when war ends? How can broken or newly established states make the transition from conflict to stability? The end of war may well be described as the "dangerous hour" as a weak state needs to address the underlying causes of the conflict such as systemic economic inequities, highly fragmented political, sociocultural networks, porous borders, and the presence of different types of criminal networks. Simultaneously, it has to establish the rule of law, disarm combatants, and respond to its obligations to international agreements. This course exposes students to some of the pertinent economic, political, legal, and ethical challenges and opportunities that face nation-states emerging from conflict. Using case studies, it critically examines some of the techniques used by both international intermediaries and local stakeholders to address issues of economic and political governance, security reform, effective human rights regimes, and post-conflict justice.
OPEN
006
Free Speech: Right Or Crime 
03.00
Benesch,S 
 
 
M       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Free Speech: Inalienable Right or Crime (3) The right of freedom of expression is being put to vigorous use around the world, in the best and worst ways, especially online. In China, netizens meet on a bootleg version of Twitter and on web forums, racing government censors who delete their posts. In France, cartoonists and others were massacred in January 2015 for the content of their magazine. On YouTube, female students' daily movements were tracked online by their classmates, along with scenarios for raping them. ISIS proudly posts videos of beheadings. In Russia, extremist bloggers call for another Holocaust. In Kenya, hate speech was broadcast via SMS blasts, leading to mass killings, but at the same time, Kenyans used SMS and the web to report and contain violence. This interdisciplinary course examines how speech contributes to democracy, as well as to hatred and atrocities. The course studies international law and policy related to freedom of expression, with special reference to digital communications, together with cases including the ones mentioned above and the knotty questions they pose, such as how to let free speech flourish while inhibiting hate, terrorism, and genocide.
SISU-379
Topics Human Rgts/Iden/Culture
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-260 or SISU-270.
OPEN
001
Pol of Policing/Incarcert/Race 
03.00
Schneider,C 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
The Politics of Policing, Incarceration, and Race in the United States and Europe (3) This course looks at the dynamic interaction of race, policing, and criminal justice in Europe and the United States. In particular, it looks at the construction of national, racial, ethnic, and religious boundaries, and the impact of these boundaries on police, penal institutions, and targeted groups in the United States and Europe. The course focuses on the way in which racial fears and political opportunism have shaped criminal justice policies in the United States and Europe.
SISU-380
Topics in Global & Comp Govern
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-280.
OPEN
001
Pol of Intl Criminal Courts 
03.00
Rudolph,C 
 
 
TF      11:20AM 12:35PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Politics of International Criminal Courts (3) Civilians have comprised half of all war-related deaths over the past three centuries. In the twentieth century, when civilian war casualties are combined with those targeted by their own governments, the number rises to nearly 360 million people. For those who experience or witness atrocities, shock and grief are often followed by an urgent cry for justice, a primal anguish born of human tragedy. During what some have called "the century of genocide," the global hue and cry for justice continued to grow. A growing global movement for justice gave rise to significant growth in international criminal law. This course explores the politics of international criminal law by examining the emergence of international courts, the factors that shaped their formation, the politics of their design, and their impact on international society. These elements are examined in depth through a study of international criminal courts, including the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals, the ICTY and ICTR, hybrid tribunals, and the International Criminal Court.
OPEN
002
Nationalism, Race and Identity 
03.00
Darden,K 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Nationalism, Race and Identity (3) This course examines the sources and consequences of the most powerful political loyalties and attachments: the bonds of peoplehood, which have motivated both war and political violence as well as empathy and sacrifice for strangers. After examining the origins of these attachments, the course seeks to use our understanding of these bonds to explain patterns of ethnic cleansing, genocide, and war, voting behavior, and secession and state formation.
OPEN
003
International Organizations 
03.00
 
 
 
MTH     12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
International Organizations (3) International organizations (IOs) are important but flawed actors in global and regional governance as they attempt to solve or avert important problems that do not respect national borders. This course examines the origins, roles, and performance of IOs in areas that include economic development, international security, trade, and humanitarian assistance.
OPEN
004
Pol/Soc Challenges in Latin Am 
03.00
Giraudy,M 
 
 
TF      02:30PM 03:45PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Political and Social Challenges in Latin America (3) This course provides an overview of the major contemporary themes debated in the Latin American politics scholarly literature. Students gain substantial theoretical and empirical knowledge on the region's models of economic development, political institutions, welfare regimes, indigenous movements, political parties, and social actors, among others. Students study both broad trends and cross-country diversity through the study of select cases, including Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Venezuela, among others. In addition, they become familiar with the major analytical debates and approaches to the study of Latin American politics and society. The seminar provides students with empirical, theoretical, and analytic tools to critically assess the unfolding of past, current, and future economic, social, and political events in Latin America.
SISU-386
Contemporary Africa
Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-280.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
LeVan,A 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-391
Internship in Int'l Studies
Permission: internship coordinator and SIS undergraduate studies office.
OPEN
001
 
01.00-06.00
Schneider,D 
 
 
 
Instructional Method: Online.
SISU-393
Int'l Relations Theory
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Adcock,R 
 
 
TF      12:55PM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
SISU-394
Comm Service Learning Project
Permission: instructor and Center for Community Engagement & Service.
OPEN
001
Int'l Food & Agri Politics 
01.00
Graddy-Lovelace,T 
 
 
 
SISU-419
Senior Capstone: Int'l Studies
Prerequisite: SISU-306. Restriction: International Studies (BA) and at least 75 credit hours.
OPEN
001
Peace and Social Justice 
03.00
McCarthy,C 
 
 
W       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Peace and Social Justice (3) This course offers a study of the methods, history, and practitioners of nonviolence and the efforts to create a justice-based society. The course familiarizes students with both the philosophy of pacifism and alternatives to violence, whether among nations or among individuals faced with violence in their daily lives. This course is discussion-based, with dissent welcomed.
CANCELLED
002
Rebellious Africa 
03.00
LeVan,A 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
Rebellious Africa (3) This course explores how political institutions shape representation and resource distribution challenges facing Africa. In addition to considering oil income, ethnic diversity and authoritarian histories, the course interrogates the complex role of religion in contemporary democracies. Readings and guest speakers examine constitutions, political party formation and institutional design in cases such as Sudan, Kenya, and Ethiopia, and assess in detail whether Nigeria's violent Islamic insurgency is a symptom of institutional failure.
OPEN
003
Evolutn of European Int'l Soc 
03.00
Banks,D 
 
 
TH      02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
The Evolution of European International Society (3) The modern worldwide system of sovereign states began as a European international society that spread across the world and eventually supplanted all alternatives. In this course students study the evolution and expansion of this system and the consequences it has had for world history and contemporary politics. The class studies what European politics looked like before sovereign states dominated, how sovereignty came into being, how European international society differed from and interacted with the international societies of other regions, and how it is evolving today.
CANCELLED
004
Emerg Technologies & Environ 
03.00
 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
Emerging Technologies and the Environment (3) Technology is at once a driver of and response to global environmental challenges. This course looks at cutting edge technologies such as nanotechnology, genetic modification, synthetic biology, and climate geoengineering, and whether these technologies will lead the way to sustainability, or make things worse.
OPEN
005
Strategies of Rebellion 
03.00
Stewart,M 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Strategies of Rebellion: From Mao to the Islamic State (3) How do rebels contest sovereignty? This course explores both the non-violent and violent strategies insurgencies deploy during the course of civil wars, to bring academic theories into dialogue with empirical realities, to develop a broader understanding of the behaviors of insurgencies, and to apply these theories to contemporary political phenomena. The course provides an overview of what civil wars are, what causes them, and who the primary actors are in domestic conflict; reviews how rebel groups are structured and how they recruit members; examines what drives insurgencies to adopt different violent strategies and tactics and which are successful; and concludes by discussing rebel non-violent strategies of rebellion and the effectiveness thereof. The course has a strong empirical component and covers several cases in (primarily) the Middle East, Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Students follow one insurgency intensively throughout the course, applying the works discussed in class to their case.
OPEN
006
Art and Post-War Healing 
03.00
Gregorian,H 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Art and Post-War Healing (3) The humanities are a rich, if an inexplicably muted color in the peacebuilding palette. Revealing a traumatic experience induces feelings of shame as well as a threat to self-survival. This course examines forms of self-expression that can help to restore self-stability and proceeds on the assumption that individual healing is one good path to community recovery and resilience. Students are exposed to various arts-based healing techniques and learn about the current practices in the use of the arts for post-conflict healing, as well as the effects of traumatic events on the body and mind and strategies for practitioner self-care.
OPEN
007
Ending Terrorism 
03.00
Cronin,A 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Ending Terrorism (3) Terrorism as a phenomenon is ancient, dating at least to the first century BCE. But individual terrorist campaigns always end. This capstone seminar focuses on understanding the endings of terrorist campaigns so as to gain insight into how best to reduce the threat of terrorism. Digging into the long-standing international experience with terrorist groups, the class discusses questions such as whether drone strikes end terrorism; should we negotiate with terrorists; does using overwhelming military force end terrorist campaigns; how do terrorists innovate; does terrorism succeed in achieving its aims; and most important, how terrorist campaigns end.
OPEN
008
Contentious Politics 
03.00
Zhang,Y 
 
 
TH      02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Contentious Politics (3) This course provides an introduction to contentious politics and helps students develop capstone projects on related topics. It places empirical emphasis on large-scale, transformative movements that often persist over time, involve massive mobilization, and result in fundamental sociopolitical changes. Historical and contemporary examples include democratic revolutions, communist revolutions, decolonization movements, nationalist movements, ethno-religious conflicts, the Arab Spring, and the Civil Rights Movement. This course introduces major theories proposing to explain the causes, courses, and consequences of these movements, while also giving attention to their contexts, complexities, and contingencies. It hence offers students analytic tools to use when conducting their research.
OPEN
009
Japanese Society & Foreign Pol 
03.00
Zhao,Q 
 
 
TH      02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Japanese Society and Foreign Policy (3) As a major power in Asia-Pacific, Japan's role has drawn attention not only from the region, but also from around the world. This course familiarizes students with a variety of theoretical and historical backgrounds that are related to Japan and the Asia-Pacific. Students then begin to examine the basic issues of Japanese society, politics, and foreign relations; and investigate the evolution of Japan's political development, policy-making process, and economic performance. Furthermore, the course pays close attention to Japan's role in the international community with specific focus on Japan's relations with the United States, and its Asian neighbors, such as China, Russia, and the two Koreas. Students actively participate in the debate over the nature of Japanese society and politics, as well as future directions of Japanese foreign policy.
OPEN
010
When Peace Creates Conflict 
03.00
Thompson,E 
 
 
M       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
When Peace Creates Conflict (3) In this course students examine World War I and the 1919 Paris Peace Conference to understand how the terms of peace can provoke ethnic, gender, religious and national conflict. Topics include how the 1918 armistice politicized the trauma of trench warfare and helped transform the Russian Revolution into civil war; how postwar treaties planted seeds of violent political movements in Eastern Europe and the Middle East; and how the new League of Nations stirred decades of anti-colonial conflict in Asia and Africa. Students choose one aspect of this history or a comparable topic for deeper research and a final project.
OPEN
011
Narcotrafficking in Mexico 
03.00
Gallaher,C 
 
 
TH      02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Narcotrafficking in Mexico (3) This course looks at the drug trade in Mexico. Although Mexico has always exported drugs into the United States, the drug trade changed substantially in the 1990s. Drug trafficking groups grew more sophisticated and more violent and kidnapping, extortion, and murder tallies all increased during the 2000s. The course introduces students to this complex trade by tracing the trade and shifts in it through the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The devastating impacts of narcotrafficking and the country's political system, its social and cultural fabric, and its economic organization are also examined.
OPEN
012
Empathy/Cuban Missile Crisis 
03.00
Brenner,P 
 
 
TH      11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Empathy, Cuban Missile Crisis, and International Conflict (3) Empathy or death! That is the key lesson the world should have derived from the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis, and it may be a lesson even more relevant today. This course explores the lessons each of the three countries, Cuba, the Soviet Union, and the United States, derived from the crisis. It then examines the role empathy and the lack of empathy played in the crisis, and considers whether empathy might be a useful approach to resolve contemporary international conflicts.
OPEN
013
Transitional Justice 
03.00
Cohn,E 
 
 
TH      11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Transitional Justice (3) This course considers reconciliation and transitional justice in countries transitioning to democracy. It explores the process of transitional justice in countries with different political histories, including Apartheid, Communism, and dictatorship or authoritarianism. By examining and comparing these cases, students gain a better understanding of the complex political, economic, social, psychological, and moral issues that countries are grappling with in their efforts to come to terms with the past. This is a writing intensive course.
OPEN
014
Neg Israeli-Palestinian Peace 
03.00
Ziv,G 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Negotiating Israeli-Palestinian Peace (3) This senior capstone provides students with a deeper understanding of the problems that have confounded the Israeli-Palestinian peace process, in particular the "final status" issues: borders, Jerusalem, refugees, and security. Students focus on the contested narratives; the relevant political actors; and the key international, regional, and internal events that have shaped the dispute. As well, previous rounds of negotiations are reviewed in order to analyze what went wrong. Students then partake in a simulation in which they attempt to constructively address the final status issues as well as other sticking points, such as settlements and terrorism, in Israeli-Palestinian peacemaking.
OPEN
015
Theory and Practice of the G20 
03.00
Nahon,M 
 
 
TH      11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Theory and Practice of the G20 (3) Since 2008, the G20 has become the premiere forum for international economic cooperation, gathering leading advanced and emerging economies alike. This course addresses the discussions, contributions and challenges of the G20 on key issues of the international economic agenda, including global growth, trade negotiations, tax and financial reform, climate change, and labor and employment.
OPEN
016
Sustainable Urban Development 
03.00
Kiechel,V 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Sustainable Urban Development (3) This course offers an opportunity for a supervised practical application of concurrently studied theory. Using a real-world collaborative project as the springboard and destination, the course considers the means, methods, and components of sustainable and adaptive cities; understands the barriers to urban sustainability; and devises and applies an integrated, globally-replicable, triple-bottom line (economically beneficial, socially equitable, and environmentally healthy) approach to a local urban context.
OPEN
017
Alt to Traditional Capitalism 
03.00
Tomasko,R 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Alternatives to Traditional Capitalism (3) This course examines the worldwide emergence of enterprises with a social as well as an economic purpose. The potential of these social enterprises in reducing inequality is considered as well as their potential to challenge and change traditional market-based capitalism. Alternatives to be covered include B-Corps, collaborative consumption/sharing economy, community-owned ventures, co-determination, co-operatives, conscious capitalism, employee ownership, shared value, and social enterprises. The emerging infrastructure to provide them with financial and management support is also considered, including mechanisms such as crowd funding, impact investing, and venture philanthropy. Students assess the potential for this sector's global growth. They analyze case studies, do fieldwork in the thriving Washington DC community of alternative enterprises, and prepare a prospectus for a potential new venture that they design.
OPEN
018
Conflict Cuisine 
03.00
Mendelson-Forman,J 
 
 
TH      02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
Program Fee: $125.00. Conflict Cuisine (3) This course explores the history and diplomacy of recent conflicts through the ultimate form of soft power: food. Gastro-diplomacy, conflict prevention, and history converge in this unique course that whets students' intellectual appetites. Classroom readings and discussions plus visits to local eateries in Washington, DC explore how the wars in Viet Nam, Afghanistan, Ethiopia, and El Salvador became local through their cuisines and the Diaspora that produces them.
SISU-432
Topics in Int'l Law & Orgs
Restriction: Washington Semester Program.
OPEN
005
Int'l Law & Orgs Seminar II 
04.00
 
 
 
W       02:30PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
International Law and Organizations Seminar II (4) This two-part seminar focuses on the expanding role of law in governing relations among nations while an interdependent world turns to multinational organizations in the making of global policy.
SISU-434
Topics Int'l Pol & For Policy
Restriction: Washington Semester Program.
OPEN
001
Int'l Pol/For Policy Sem I 
04.00
 
 
 
W       08:10AM 11:00AM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
International Politics and Foreign Policy Seminar I (4) This two-part seminar is devoted to United States foreign policy formulation and implementation. Systematic study of foreign policy emphasizes qualitative analysis and employs quantitative methods as appropriate. Students participate in seminars, workshops, on-site observation, and meet with foreign policymakers and influencers from government, media, and other private-sector organizations.
OPEN
006
Int'l Pol/For Policy Intern 
04.00
 
 
 
W       04:05PM 05:20PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18
 
International Politics and Foreign Policy Internship (4) Students engage in an internship in Washington, D.C., providing direct experience in an organization related to international politics and foreign policy
SISU-441
SIS Honors Project II
Prerequisite: SISU-440.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Knight,S 
 
 
M       11:20AM 02:10PM  TBA  TBA    01/16/18 05/08/18