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International Reporting Fellowship

Pulitzer Center Campus Consortium Student Reporter Fellowship

Are you a budding international journalist with a passion of going to another country to report on underreported systemic issue? The Pulitzer Center Campus Consortium International Reporting Student Fellowship is looking for you.  

The School of Communication at American University has joined forces with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting to become a member of the Center’s Campus Consortium. The Campus Consortium initiative is a core component of the Pulitzer Center’s effort to create awareness campaigns around the global systemic issues that affect us all.

Questions: Contact professor Bill Gentile.


Left to right American University School of Communication dean Jeff Rutenbeck, PhD student Kara Andrade, graduating senior Julia Boccagno, and Eric Hershberg, director of the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies. Photo by Bill Gentile.

Left to right American University School of Communication dean Jeff Rutenbeck, PhD student Kara Andrade, graduating senior Julia Boccagno, and Eric Hershberg, director of the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies. Photo by Bill Gentile.

Student Reporting Fellowships

As part of Campus Consortium Membership, AU and the Pulitzer Center will select two students for international reporting projects of their choice involving an underreported systemic issue. One student will be selected from SOC, with a second student to be selected from the university at large. Each student fellow will be awarded $2,500.00 to help pay for the reporting project. Pulitzer Center staff and journalists act as mentors for students throughout the fellowship, with final products featured on the Pulitzer Center website. Fellows also work with the Pulitzer Center in efforts to further disseminate the work through media partners. Kara Andrade and Julia Boccagno were selected as AU's 2015 Pulitzer Center Fellows.

AU’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) is a contributing partner to this initiative. One of the fellows will focus on subject matter related to the Center's work on religion and Latin American affairs.

Campus Visits
During Spring semester, SOC will host a series of campus visits in which Pulitzer Center journalists will share experience and research. These events will be open to students and the public at large.

To develop the visits and related programming, the Pulitzer Center relies on a network of more than 300 journalists worldwide who have received Pulitzer Center grants, as well as on partner institutions, to foster broader discussions and more nuanced analysis of concerns that span disciplines, from journalism and business to law, religion and public health. This interdisciplinary approach receives support from the diverse topics Pulitzer Center grantees report on, from HIV/AIDS and maternal health to the human impact of commodities production.

Q&A

What is the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting?
The Pulitzer Center is an innovative award-winning non-profit journalism organization dedicated to supporting the independent international journalism that U.S. media organizations are less able to undertake.

The center focuses on under-reported issues and getting information beyond what is in the headline.

UPOEG community leader and political activist Miguel Angel Jiménez Blanco collects voters’ testimonies of alleged vote-buying and coercion in San Marcos, Guerrero in June. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

UPOEG community leader and political activist Miguel Angel Jiménez Blanco collects voters’ testimonies of alleged vote-buying and coercion in San Marcos, Guerrero in June. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

How is American University involved?
The relationship between AU and the Pulitzer Center started in 2010 during an initiative, Project Report. Since then, the Pulitzer Center was so impressed by the work ethic and knowledge of the students that they wanted to add AU as a Campus Consortium Partner school.

The Pulitzer Center Campus Consortium International Reporting Student Fellowship is also partnering with AU’s Center for Latin American & Latin Studies (CLALS).

Do you have to be a journalist to win the fellowship?
No, you don’t. If you are interested in international news, a good story teller and have strong verbal and written communication skills, this fellowship is perfect for you.

How many fellows are selected and what do they get?
AU and the Pulitzer Center will select two students for international reporting projects of their choice involving an underreported systemic issue.

One student will be selected from SOC and a second student will be selected from the University at large. Each student fellow will receive $2,500 to help pay for the reporting project, which lasts for a minimum of two weeks.

After the selected students fill out the required paperwork to being their fellowship, they are connected with a professional journalist that serves as a mentor while they are abroad.

Is there a limit to the work fellows can produce?
The fellows are treated as staff members. The fellows are going to produce stories for different mediums and their work will be featured on the Pulitzer Center website.

Pulitzer Student Fellow Julia Boccagno prepares to interview a transgender cabaret performer backstage at Tiffany's Show Pattaya. Image Courtesy of Julia Boccagno. Thailand, 2015

Pulitzer Student Fellow Julia Boccagno prepares to interview a transgender cabaret performer backstage at Tiffany's Show Pattaya. Image Courtesy of Julia Boccagno. Thailand, 2015

What does the money cover and how is it dispersed?
The money is dispersed in two increments. The first half of the money will be given to the fellows after they produce paperwork stating their commitment to the program. The remainder will be distributed on submission of the principal material for publication or broadcast. Specific grant terms are negotiated during the application process.

The awarded $2,500 covers everything but any shots required to visit the country, housing, food and if needed, an interpreter. The fellows may also want to use their own expenses when booking a flight and obtaining a passport.

Is there anything in particular that can make me stand out as a candidate?
Being able to speak the language of the country you want travel to is a major plus as a candidate. Also, make sure that the 250-word project proposal requirement in the application package is thoroughly written and interesting.

How can we apply and when is the deadline?
Interested students should submit hard and electronic copies of the application to Professor Bill Gentile billgentile@billgentile.com no later than midnight of Friday, March 31, 2017. His office is located in the McKinley Building, room 230.

When will the winners be announced?
Fellowship winners will be announced the week of Monday, April 24, 2017.