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SPA In the Media

Welcome to the School of Public Affairs' faculty media listing. Below you can view a complete chronological listing of faculty expertise presented through media outlets like The New York Times, CNN, the Associated Press and more. For more information, or if you'd like to contact SPA's faculty as a source for your media outlet, visit AU's media relations home page.

April 2016

Recent research from Seth Gershenson, assistant professor of public administration and policy, was featured in an article on The 74 Million on April 27. His research illustrates a positive effect of the maligned No Child Left Behind Act; namely that it improved teacher attendance in struggling schools.

James Thurber, director of the Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies, spoke with the National Journal on April 25 about the likelihood of Hillary Clinton lifting President Obama's restrictions on lobbyists serving in the administration.

Chris Edelson, assistant professor of government, was interviewed on the radio show Politics of the United States (POTUS) on April 24 about the current extent of executive power.

Chris Edelson, assistant professor of government, wrote an article for Government Executive on April 22 about the constitutional limits of executive power.

Eric Hershberg, director of the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies, was an expert panelist for an article for WalletHub that looked at some of the issues Hispanic entrepreneurs encounter in different states.

Robert Tobias, distinguished practitioner in residence, spoke to Federal News Radio on April 21 about how to solve difficult problems that limit the effectiveness of the federal government.

James Thurber, director of the Center for Congressional & Presidential Studies, spoke to Truthout on April 20 about the reporting of lobbyist activity.

David Lublin, professor of government, spoke to Roll Call on April 19 about the current state of legislative affairs in Congress.

Eric Hershberg, director of the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies, spoke to Fox News Latino on April 15 about the ineffectiveness of the Honduran government in bringing legal justice to its country.

Jennifer Lawless, director of the Women & Politics Institute, was featured in an article for the Portland Tribune on April 15 following a presentation she delivered at Portland State University. The article highlighted her research into women running for public office.

Robert Durant, professor emeritus of public administration and policy, was part of an expert panel for an article for WalletHub that looked at the federal dependency of a variety of states.

Adrienne LeBas, assistant professor of government, wrote an article for The Washington Post on April 15 about her research into how Nigeria has improved its ability to increase taxes.

William LeoGrande, professor of government, spoke to 9 News on April 14 and the Miami Herald on April 15 about what form the Cuban economy may take going forward.

David Lublin, professor of government, spoke to WEAA on April 14 about the Supreme Court's ruling on voting.

Jennifer Lawless, director of the Women & Politics Institute, spoke to Time on April 13 about the language used to describe Hillary Clinton's qualifications.

Erik Devereux, senior adjunct professorial lecturer, wrote an article for PA Times on April 12 which argued for a different approach to solving issues such as poverty and inequality.

David Lublin, professor of government, spoke to The Philadelphia Tribune on April 9 about how the Supreme Court's ruling in a case on voting rights will affect the issue going forward.

William LeoGrande, professor of government, spoke to the Associated Press for an article that appeared in The New York Times on April 8 about how the Cuban economy will change in the coming years.

A new episode of Bloomberg News' podcast Masters in Politics which is hosted by Betsy Fischer Martin, executive in residence, was released on April 7. The podcast looks at how the presidential primaries may turn out for both the Republican and Democratic parties.

Barbara Romzek, dean of the School of Public Affairs, spoke to The Washington Post on April 6 about how accountability in the federal government is supposed to work.

Anita McBride, executive in residence, was interviewed by The Washington Post on April 6 about how various first ladies have approached and embraced the role throughout American history.

David Lublin, professor of government, spoke to KVAL 13 on April 6 about the Democratic primary process and how superdelegates influence the party's nomination. The article was syndicated across multiple news outlets.

Jennifer Lawless, director of the Women & Politics Institute, spoke to The Washington Times on April 5 about how Donald Trump will be unlikely to gain the support of female voters.

Chris Edelson, assistant professor of government, was part of an expert panel for an article for ABC 2 on April 4 that was syndicated across multiple news outlets. The panel discussed how the Supreme Court justices handle the political nature of the nomination process.

Jennifer Lawless, director of the Women & Politics Institute, spoke to NBC News on April 2 about why there are fewer females in political office.

A study co-authored by Jan Leighley, professor of government, was used in an article for The New Yorker on April 1. The study looked at the differences in the political views between voters and non-voters.

William LeoGrande, professor of government, spoke to McClatchy DC on April 1 about how Cuba may be more likely to repress dissidents within its country since opening up relations with the U.S.

Robert Durant, professor emeritus of public administration and policy, was featured in a WalletHub article about 2016's most and least federally dependent states.

Michael Bader, Metropolitan Policy Center fellow, wrote an article for the Los Angeles Times on April 1 that looked at how many neighborhoods in Los Angeles have followed a trend of becoming increasingly racially homogenous and less integrated in the past few decades.

A study co-authored by Seth Gershenson, assistant professor of public administration and policy, was featured in articles in NBC News and The Independent on March 31 and April 1 respectively. The study looked at teachers' potential racial biases in assessing students' potential. Gershenson also spoke to The Independent about his research and how he will proceed with it in the future.