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Global Majority

Volume 6, Number 2 — download full December 2015 issue.


LIVING IN CITIES: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN URBANIZATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN THAILAND VERSUS INDONESIA

By Abd Wafiee Abd Wahab

Being two of the five founding countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Indonesia and Thailand have greatly impacted the region’s economic and political issues. Both countries also have seen massive urbanization over the last few decades and have now large shares of their populations living in urban areas. Though Thailand began the process of urban development much earlier than Indonesia, today, the share of the urban population is higher in Indonesia than in Thailand. In any case, urbanization has helped both Thailand and Indonesia to experience rapid economic growth. This article illustrates and compares the impacts of urbanization in the two nations. It looks into the economic and social benefits as well as costs of rapid population growth in the capitals of these two countries, namely Bangkok for Thailand, and Jakarta for Indonesia.

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PREPARING FOR A BETTER FUTURE:
AN ANALYSIS OF THE YOUTH OF NIGERIA AND MEXICO

By Haley Bowcutt

Children are the key for the future of developing countries. In Nigeria, opportunities for youths are slim due to poor health and little educational opportunities, leading to low school enrollment ratios and low literacy rates. The health and education for youths in Mexico is much better; however, a variety of illegal activities have pulled the Mexican youths in the wrong direction. The need for children to work for income is necessary in both developing countries, oftentimes leading these youths to drop out of school and join the workforce, even becoming involved in illegal activities.

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AGREE TO "PLAN B": THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF ACCESS TO CONTRACEPTION IN EGYPT AND THE PHILIPPINES

By Rachel Falek

Egypt and the Philippines are developing countries with differing levels of unmet needs for family planning. Egypt has a government-led national family planning program, but women are still having more children than they consider ideal. In the Philippines, where the population has doubled in the last three decades, there is little access to contraception, and abortion is illegal. This article discusses the reasons for low levels of contraception access in the Philippines and higher levels of contraception access in Egypt, including cultural and structural influences. It examines the efforts each country is undertaking to decrease its fertility rate. The article further analyzes the effects of low access rates, as well as the gender inequality that is at the root of unmet family planning.

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CHILD LABOR AND HUMAN TRAFFICKING: HOW CHILDREN IN BURKINA FASO AND GHANA LOSE THEIR CHILDHOOD

By Kaitie Kudlac

This article examines the impact and effects of human trafficking, child labor, and the various forms of mortality and immunization in the West African countries of Burkina Faso and Ghana. While human trafficking and inadequate labor laws encompasses all ages and genders, the primary focus of this article is to examine child trafficking and child labor and the degree to which people sold into slavery or forced labor are below eighteen years of age in these West African countries. Through the use of a literature review and the analysis of data provided by the World Bank and other scholarly sources, this article provides a comparison and an analysis on the effects of children “losing their childhood” in the two countries and the impacts of children born and raised in these West African nations. The concluding remarks of this article introduces and analyzes some solutions.

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About the
Global Majority E-Journal

The Global Majority E-Journal is published twice a year and freely available online. The journal publishes articles that discuss critical issues for the lives of the global majority. The global majority is defined as the more than 80 percent of the world’s population living in developing countries. The topics discussed include poverty, population growth, access to safe water, climate change, agricultural development, etc. The articles are based on research papers written by AU undergraduate students (mostly freshmen) as one of the course requirements for AU’s General Education Course: Econ-110—The Global Majority.

Syllabus for the Global Majority

ISSN 2157-1252

 

See also:

Volume 6, Issue 1

Articles by AnLi Kelly-Durham, Zachary Porter, Olivia So, and Gregory Tenor.

 

Volume 5, Issue 1

June 2014 issue features articles by Joel Iscaro, Toby N. G. McCarroll, Rebecca O'Neill, Amélie Thouvenot, and Kevin Werner

 

Volume 5, Issue 2

December 2014 issue features articles by Kianna Billman, Maude Fitzmaurice, Samantha Ufret and Giorgio Zenere.

 

Volume 4, Issue 1

June 2013 issue features articles by Olivia Bell, Bailey Edelstein, Rachel Lomot, and Lila Rieber.

Volume 4, Issue 2

December 2013 issue features articles from Kerry Milazzo, Nathan Strauss, Yeomin Ryu, and Michael Bible.

Volue 3, Issue 2

December 2012 issue features articles from Janina Calabro, Emily Platt, Carlos Andréu, Morgan Hendrix.

Volume 3, Issue 1

June 2012 issue features articles from Lindsay Sandoval, Salman Dossani, Christian Winters, Liza Romanow, and Megan Clark
 

Volume 2, Issue 2

December 2011 issue features articles from Robert Book, Will Lawther, Ana Cristina Sauri Faller, Brittany Traeger, and Hiromi Yagi
 

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